landscaping privacy

Was wondering what others have done to put up privacy barriers between neighboring homes.
I'm on a corner lot in a "typical" suburban sub division. The lot is about a 200' x 100' size. There is a house to one side, and one behind, kinda looks like this:
[neighbor] | xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx(fence) | [neighbor]---------[my house]----------------[street] | | | [ street ]
(not to scale).
My dilemma is, I'd like to put up some privacy barriers on the left & right sides in the above diagram (to the home on the left above, and to the street). to make a private yard that would encompass the area on the left, to the rear, and part of the section to the right.
I've gotten all kinds of 'suggestions' - but i thought i would post to this group and collect some more before i make a decision.
Many of the suggestions involved planting trees or hedges. Additional fencing is a thought, but I would still need a lot more trees to block out views of the neighbors (since the fence height is only 6').
All the planting ideas involve waiting a LONG time for usable privacy (like YEARS).
I'm in the northeastern USA.
Does anyone have actual experience with some species of tree or hedge, that works in one season or less ? (or some other idea to achieve the privacy goal).
I've interviewed professional landscaping *architects* (not landscaping contractors), but i want to exhaust the DIY design route first before spending $$$ on retainers to have architects construct designs (like the folks you see on HGTV).
Anyone here have any thoughts on privacy barriers ?
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Call this company: http://www.musserforests.com /
I seem to recall their catalog mentioning certain shrubs which grew quickly and were great for privacy. They sell small plants in large quantities, usually at highly competitive prices.
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Stewie wrote:

Regarding plantings, etc. you might also want to ask on rec.garden for stuff that may grow more quickly.
Give your county and state in your post, (not just "Northeastern US" which covers a *lot*of territory) as those folks really do hone in on actual locations regarding plant recommendations.
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He should also contact his local cooperative extension office before spending any money, to be sure there are no plagues affecting certain plants lately. It would be a shame (but a windfall for his chiropractor) if he dug 37 holes this year, and had to do it all over again next year.
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Stewie wrote:

Yeah, you may not have the legal right to erect ANYTHING (hedge, fence, trees, etc.) on property bordering a street due to city ordinances or deed restrictions.
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"HeyBub" wrote

I gather the neighbor has a 2 story? Otherwise 6ft would be sufficient for most folks. They also have fences in 8 ft tall but they cost quite a bit more.

Yes, and I'd shy away from that as the primary type although you could use this in front of the 'fencing' and give it time to grow.
My experience is that anything that grows really fast either also dies fast, or is invasive. How much time do you have to spend trimming it?

Well, generally so am I but that doesnt mean much when recommending plants <g>. Don't be afraid to list a state. It's not going to cause you trouble. I live in Coastal Virginia for example.

None that I know of do. I do have some nice vines along a fence that grow fast in spring and with minimal 'training' cover the gaps between my wood fence by summer. They die out in winter.

Excellent point (and why I chose this one to reply to). In my area, city zoning means you have to leave a good strip back from the street when planting or fencing. Stewie, check that first as it can be a very expensive mistake. I'll add that corner lots often have a hydrant so have special rules that must be followed. You can also find the storm drain for the street is on your lot and in that case, may not be allowed to plant anything with invasive root potential within 15 ft (I think it's 15 feet, not exactly sure but thats *my* area and I mention it only so you can think about these things then ask).
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Things that grow in FAST also tend to get BIG over time, so some compromise may be needed.
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Guy.net.org> wrote:

I like the full sized non-dwarf "Burning Bush" for this use, they will establish in 2 seasons and grow dense enough to hide onlookers. And they turn a bright crimson in the fall.
=====================
Barberry, too, although just one 6 foot bush is a major project to trim. I can't imagine dealing with a long hedge of them.
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["Followup-To:" header set to alt.building.construction.] On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 11:04:48 -0500, Stewie

Quick-growing shrubs and trees are typically quite invasive or weak-wooded, often short-lived, and trouble not very far down the road. IF you go this way, have back-up plan in place, such as "lombardy poplars for the next 5-6 years and the sugar maples should be big enough by then so I can take the poplars down."
If you can have trellises taller than fences (check with your code office), you might consider fast-growing vines like hops for temporary cover, to be replaced by more permanent landscaping later. Check locally to find out what sort of vines you're going to regret having planted in your area before making final plant selections.
Big umbrellas are good, too, especially for the "neighbor's looking out the second floor windows while I'm sunbathing" sorts of issues, as are things like pole-bean structures and rose arbors.
Talk to your local extension service about what plants would be suitable for your situation. Some of the "old reliables" are now not so reliable because of disease or insect problems that have cropped up. If you're in one of the smaller states, also check the extension service websites of neighboring states.
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wrote:

weak-wooded,
5-6
office),
before
the
for
many thanks to all those who replied.
still researching options.
best regards
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I planted about 600' of 24" one gallon Leyland Cypress. Now they are 30' tall except for the portion I trim to 10'. It grows 5' a year once established. Be careful though. If you let it get out of bounds, you'll have a big job getting back in bounds.
RO
--
Robert Olin
Bob\'s Water & Septic LLC
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And they'd like to grow to 60 feet or more. They tend to get dead spots if pruned too much.
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Stay indores but some eff'n thet thar tin foil on all yer windows yo'll be fine then
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Move to a 100 acre place, then you will have privacy. ;)
Free men own guns - www(dot)geocities(dot)com/CapitolHill/5357/
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On Feb 12, 8:04 am, "Stewie" <Stewie@I-shall-rule-the-wor...@Family- Guy.net.org> wrote:

Bamboo. You have to encase it with a 2 foot deep ground barrier.
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we use to have a row of hollybushes that grew to about 12 feet tall and we lost control of them, I turned our privacy row of holly bushes into a row of hollybush tree's and it looks great. now they are 16+ feet tall and act as a wind barrier on the west side of the house in storms.
make sure you find out if their is any cables along the stretch you tend to plant in. and check city code to see how far back from the curb you have to build.
try rows of ceder tree's as grass grows right up to their trunks and you can mow around them, and they are green all year long. please birds love to build nest in them. we have 4 bird nest in 1 ceder tree
also take into effect in 5-10 years at 16-feet for similiar trees or bushes as they will cut the sunlight off for the part of the yard and grass won't grow.
Stewie wrote:

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Don't plant holly if you are ever going to have people walking around in bare feet. Ouch!
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Or barberry. Great for turning dogs into ribbons, though. :-)
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