It's raining on my frame

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It's been raining on my damn house for 3 days now with no roof. It's raining directly onto the second floor deck. Is this a problem? Is this just a fact of life? Will there be damage? What should I do? What *can* I do? The builder said he brushed on Thompson's water seal onto the floor deck. Does that help? Thanks. -John
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Oh crap! Yer just gonna have to torch it and start over.
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message

Let it dry first!
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If he lets it dry he can open a tobbogan <sp> and ski store!
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relax. plywood/osb can take a lot of water--google "exposure 1 plywood." people will tell you how terrible it is, yet the only time i've heard of someone having trouble with a subfloor, the manufacturer paid to replace it. it ain't gonna melt in the rain.
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I'll be using OSB on my garage but only one side is waterproof, the shiney side. Unfortunately that is also the slipperyest side too.
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Don wrote:

Don, I'd double check that, http://www.osbguide.com/faqs/faq14.html That site claims *textured* side up.
I installed OSB for a floor shiny side up and it went scaly from snow and stuff that I tracked in. I thought shiny side would be easier to sweep, but I think I made a mistake over-all. Ken
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"Ken S. Tucker"> wrote

Hmmm...I will check that out. I was just told last week by my brother, shiny side up. Regardless, I'll have black paper on the whole thing almost immediately. I've seen roofs sit for weeks in FL with OSB on and no felt and there were no problems. Where I'm at though the cold air combined with massive rain may make a fatal mix. BTW: I'm going to install blocking between the trusses at 48" centers. I never liked the idea that roof plywood is only nailed at the trusses. I want my plywood nailed on all 4 sides.
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Don wrote:

Ah, is this the brother that you played "who can punch the lightest" with :-).

"fatal" don't see why, I had a floor (October) that had ice on it in the morning, wasn't happy but, it was to be a sub-floor if quality is an issue.

Well if it's 5/8" tongue & groove, which is easy to glue and a bit of easy pounding, usually makes a good fit. Not sure any tangible benefit can be derived for the labor of blocking. Ken
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"Ken S. Tucker"> wrote

A frozen roof is a little different than a frozen floor.
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In a previous post Ken S. Tucker wrote...

Ken:
Actually, there is a structural benefit. A blocked diaphragm has a higher load capacity for the same nail spacing as an unblocked diaphragm.
Having said that, it takes a pretty big roof (think 60x100) before one even begins to approach the load capacity of an unblocked diaphragm.
For 7/16" OSB or 15/32" plywood, edge clips at midspan are required by code when the support spacing is more than 16" o/c. However, if you use 19/32" (5/8") sheathing then clips are not required.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
  Click to see the full signature.
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Bob Morrison wrote:

I've used blocking between trusses to keep them aligned vertically, but because the roof was T&G, I didn't worry about them being carefully aligned to any seam so the blocks could be offset for easy nailing. A floor is a different story (pun) because a live load moves on it and blocking transfers load to adjacents joists. But a roof has a dead snow load, and for the most part, each truss is equally burdened so blocking them for strength is not very effective, that I can see.

Not sure I recall Don mentioning his roof sheathing, certainly if it's not T&G then blocking for the edges is certainly best, (I've done that on small buildings).

Thanks Ken
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In a previous post Ken S. Tucker wrote...

Ken:
I should have been more specific. The higher load capacity is for LATERAL LOADS, not gravity loads like snow.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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Bob Morrison wrote:

Hear ya, wow, as a kid I loved studying the inside of old barns, could almost smell the sweat and intelligence in framing those roofs. The timber in those is awesome, especially the axe marks. In the progressive 60's and 70's those were discarded as junk as New & Improved metal tech vogued, and the original barns were left to decay. But you gotta love the neat truss designs they used, and as you mention, designed for serious lateral (wind+) loads too. Recall the different styles of lightning rods? Thanks Ken Ps: a helicopter just landed in the neighbours yard.
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Ken S. Tucker wrote:

Turns out they we're just practising, but the neighbours aren't there - it's an empty lot - so wife asked them about it. Fortunately alls well and good. Ken
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There is a specified way to install OSB on both floors and walls. OSB can handle being exposed to some pretty harsh weather. I'm a framer in Utah, and we get tons of snow and rain on the benches.. We've chipped away icebergs from our floors and still not have a squeak. The only time you really need to worry about your OSB is when it is sitting ON the ground. or soaking IN a puddle, but as far as having rain hitting it, that's not a problem. if you have puddles in your floor, then your framers should be kicked, but just smack a hole in it with your hammer and it'll drain. Since it's engineered wood, you wouldn't need to worry about your little hole ruining the stuctural stability..
Ken S. Tucker wrote:

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"frawggy"> wrote

Unless you carpet over it and the wife steps on it with a highheel..... Ooops.
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JD wrote:

Yeah, and that'll solve the stairway problem, too !!!!
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"Sasquatch"> wrote

You can drape a million dollars worth of tarps over it. Or do a reverse rain dance. I'll be going through the same thing next week. It rains like 4 mf around here and right now my truck is stuck in about a foot of pure mud where the driveway used to be. This is all new stuff to me. Onward.
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Don wrote:

Yeah, we're in the rainy season around here, too. But it beats the snowy season.
Do you want to compare crappy weather forecasts. Here's ours. You can't make up the crap.
Tonight: A slight chance of showers after midnight. Cloudy, with a low around 47. West wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Thursday: Showers likely, mainly after noon. Cloudy, with a high near 61. South wind between 4 and 7 mph becoming calm. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.
Thursday Night: Periods of rain. Low around 40. Light wind becoming north between 13 and 16 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New rainfall amounts between three quarters and one inch possible.
Friday: Periods of rain, mainly before noon. High near 48. Northwest wind between 11 and 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.
Friday Night: A chance of showers, mainly before 8pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 35. West wind between 6 and 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Saturday: A slight chance of showers before 8am. Partly cloudy, with a high near 51. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Saturday Night: A chance of rain showers after 8pm, mixing with snow after 4am. Partly cloudy, with a low around 34. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Sunday: Snow or rain showers likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 50. Chance of precipitation is 60%.
Sunday Night: Rain showers mixed with snow showers likely. Cloudy, with a low around 35. Chance of precipitation is 60%.
Monday: A chance of snow or rain showers. Cloudy, with a high near 45. Chance of precipitation is 50%.
Monday Night: A chance of snow or rain showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 28. Chance of precipitation is 50%.
Tuesday: A chance of snow or rain showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 43. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
Tuesday Night: A chance of showers. Partly cloudy, with a low around 29. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Wednesday: A chance of snow or rain showers. Partly cloudy, with a high near 44. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
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