Installing 46" TV on dry wall?


As you might understand, my sister has had a house built, and in the basement there's a dry wall, 3/8" or whatever the standard thickness for dry walls is (don't ask me, I am the electrician), and they want to install this LCD panel. Is the dry wall srong enough to hold that TV? Obviously, I am going to put special metal "screws" that in turn accept regular screws. Or should we forget the whole thing, saw the drywall off and install the TV on the wall? TIA,
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Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 22:15:16 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitrios"

No sheetrock is strong enough to hold a small, light picture frame but not a TV. Mount to a stud. I'm assuming the wall has wood 2x4 studs, if they are steel studs things may be more difficult.

What is the weight of the set?
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wrote:

these materials are cheap here.Wood is very expensive and almost obsolete as a building material (even windows are made of aluminium and plastic). The gypsum board is in front of the brick wall.

Thanks anyway, you verified my thought that the drywall will not support a TV.
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*The LCD TV's that are installed on walls in the USA have wall brackets made just for them. Since you have masonry behind the drywall you should just plan on using masonry anchors with screws long enough to pass through the drywall. Drywall in the USA is usually 1/2" thick. If you can, purchase the wall bracket ahead of time and read the instructions. They may provide some insight as to the strength needed to support the TV.
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then, *how* shall I fix the bracket. Nice idea, though to put long enough screws to install on the masonry behind... If I can find a long enough drill bit, too....
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 23:51:02 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitrios"

How is the gypsum board attached to the brick wall?
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wrote:

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If you have stone or brick, any good anchors will work. Another choice that may work better for you or even if it is drywall on studs would be to mount a piece of plywood large enough to be fastened to studs or whatever the wall is made of with plans to mount the TV bracket to the plywood. The board can be routed or framed and can be painted or stained. I usually make a 3/4" board, run a router around the edges, and paint flat black.
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I'm getting the impression from the OP that there are no studs, but that the gypsum board is somehow attached to a brick wall.
I think the other reply of using masonary anchors into that brick wall is the way to go.
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I have used the board method on concrete block, brick, drywall and studs, plaster on terra cotta tile, plaster on black iron, and poured concrete. It just allows you to get anchors where the wall will accept them. Trying to get a Topcon or similar to hold right where you need it for the TV can be problematic.
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Find the studs and attach a bracket that will hold the TV Studs only.......no drywall fasteners. Use a magnet device to locate the nails or screws and then mark the stud and put your attachment on the studs only. They make arms that swing in and out for this purpose.... Or you may have an attachment reccomendation in your manual and use that but make sure to attach to studs only........... A person could attach a piece of ply or wood to the wall hidden by the TV to attach to also but this would need to be firmly attached to the framing. jloomis

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*supposed" to hold the TV. Here, we use steel studs for drywall I have a device to locate steel behind the drywall, though. I'll give it a go next time I go to my sis' site....
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Well I guess you have to attach to metal studs too. I do not see a problem with that. john

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wrote:

Agreed, you need to locate the steel studs, and mount through them. You should not have problems finding a bit long enough to go through the stud to the masonary, they are common enough around here (the USA).
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