How to Hang large extension ladder on Garage Wall?

Hi All - Does anyone know the best way or what type of bracker/hanger to hang a heavy duty extension ladder (12ft closed, weighs around 50lbs +) on a garage wall which is sheet rock. The only thing I came across are these types of hangers (see link), but they don't seem to give much support. These would presumably just go in the sheet rock because I could not manually screw these into a stud and I would be afraid they would tear out over time and come crashing down on my auto. Any other recommendations would be most appreciated.
http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
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The sheetrock will not hold those brackets, they are designed to be screwed into the studs. They may require predriling with a smaller lead bit.
A couple of well placed 16d nails driven into the studs and left sticking out will work.
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On Sun, 28 Oct 2007 07:47:54 -0700, Atari26004Fun

You would have to screw these into a stud. Why you could not 'manually' screw them into a stud is yet to be clarified, are you just physically weak, or is there another reason (like the studs are steel?)
Nothing, repeat nothing will hold a load screwed into sheetrock. Whatever you use must be attached to studs for strength, else it will fall on you or your car. Probably both at the same time.
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The type of hanger you found would work fine, you just have to screw them into the studs behind the sheetrock. The sheetrock itself won't hold anything. Use a stud finder to locate the studs, then predrill some holes a bit smaller than the hanger your using. Maybe rub a little soap on the threads for lubrication, and screw them in. You'll probably have enough leverage with just the "L" shape of the hanger to screw them in by hand, or you can use a pair of pliers or vice grips to gain a little more torque.
In the past, I made my own ladder hanger brackets out of wood, reinforced with plywood on the sides. I lagged these into the studs. A bit of work, but I had the spare lumber laying around and they didn't cost me anything.
In my garage, I didn't want to lose the wall space it takes to hang a large ladder, so I built cabinets that mount to the wall, and the ladder gets stowed underneath. It has worked very well for me. I've uploaded a photo to:
www.mountain-software.com/cabinets01.jpg
I store my shorter extension and step ladders upright, leaning against a wall in a corner. They're easy to access and I lose very little wall space this way.
If all else fails, a trip to your local home center or hardware store will open up lots of brackets and hangers made for storing ladders.
Good luck,
Anthony
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http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
Some heavier and of size shelf brackets may work, as well as some mailbox support brackets off the shelf. Making suitable brackets for holding a ladder on the wall is rather simple. Irregardless, all must be mounted to the wall studs, not the sheetrock. The sheetrock may be penetrated to reach such a stud. Lag bolt and washer with 1" or more penetration in the stud is suggested for hardware using a shelf bracket. You will need more than 2 to support 50 lbs without flex.
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