How much floor tile to phyicall layout first?

I have about 415 sq. ft of bare concrete basement floor that I need to tile. Some areas do get a little moist at times. I'm saying this in case I am wrong already. I'm planning on thinsetting directly to it. Haven't even thought about cleaning, muriatic acid. There are 5 general areas that are connected throughout by tiles but are spaciated by partition walls, doors, and/or utilities. Before I get started I know a little about starting in doorways, etc, and pre-planning the layout. My question is about layout. I will probably use 12" tiles, not sure how the gap will affect the real space between as far as exact layout ends up, but I will have to think about where all the thresholds will be affected by all the others, since all my areas are connected. I am planning on using all the same tile, no colour or size differences. Any recommendations on type of tile so far. I will be thinking cheap, even presentation end of an aisle at HD cheap. I don't know nothing about the longevity, scratch resistance, etc. of such tiles
I can see all areas by standing in one spot, the max distance (and a full course passing through one doorway threshold) is about 26 feet, 19 feet in the perpendicular direction, also a full course passing through one doorway threshold. There are 2 other, well 2-1/2 other doorway thresholds to worry about.
MY Question: After I buy all the tiles, do I physically lay out at least one full course in all directions? To physically be in all the thresholds, get all the important variables understood in physical reality. Short of laying down the whole floor. I don't need to do that do I? I'm just asking. I may want to, who knows. Never laid a floor. I have screwed a tree though Then I mark a line to follow!? btw I do have a laser level and tripod I can use to assist.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The smaller the tile the greater the percentage of grout overall. Grout is quite porous, tiles much less so. If the floor gets wet smaller tiles will dry out faster than large ones. They'll also 'handle' a less-than-flat slab better.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a good book called "Setting Tile" by Michael Byrne. It has been in print for awhile, but all the layout information is as valid as ever. He uses a few different methods. For small areas he pretty much lays out most of the tile dry. For larger areas he uses a layout stick, like a horizontal 'story board'. The book is readily available online. I bought a copy after a recommendation on this newsgroup, and certainly recommend it myself.
--
Dennis


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bent wrote:

Imagining the space you describe, and the experience you state you have, thinking about the "optimal" layout is ridiculous. If you insist on laying the floor continuous my input would be to select one or two areas where you feel layout would be crucial and let the rest of the floor fall where it falls. With 5 separate areas and the subsequent doorways you will likely never come up with an "optimal" layout and may spend a few dozen times as long as it will take to lay the floor trying to come up with such a layout. One option may be to simplify your work by installing thresholds at each door location (marble/oak) allowing you to address each location on its own reducing your work to alignment on a single axis. Often times with large expanses of tile introducing another material in the thresholds really compliments the floor and acts as an eye stopper.
That said it sounds like you have bigger problems in that you state you have some areas that get wet and have not even addressed cleaning the substrate and ensuring the tile will actually stick. I would suggest doing a lot of homework and research before jumping into this one not to mention dealing with the wet spots first.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.