Help on constructing a new floor is existing house.

Man I'm all screwed up here. I need help bad. To start, let me say 20 years or so ago I had a B1 General Contractors license in Califorina. I don't have it now and don't do this type of work anymore. I was a carpenter and built homes for over 15 years in the past so I do have building knowledge.
I got myself in a big jam. Where I work is an old house that needed a lot of work. We started with needing to replace the kitchen floor tile (ceramic) and kitchen cabinets. As people in the building trade know, remodels have a lot of uncertainty to them and take on a life of their own. One thing lead to another (because of the condition of the house) that we ended up having to tear out 4 layers of flooring and ended up going competely to floor joist. Things got worse. The existing joist was the old 2x6 that was not the same dimensions as new lumber and the joist spacing was just a mess, some on 24" centers and some on 30" centers. Ended up removing all the joist also and went down to existing floors beams on piers. Started to get the game plan together for putting in a new floor and bam, got busted by the local building department for not having a building permit. Yeah I know, I was a dumb ass but the plan never was what it ended up being. We under estimated how severe of a problem we had.
So now I have to submit plans yada yada. Being out of the trade for so long, I am not entirely up to speed on what the building department is going to require regarding this floor and the piers specifically. These piers are the big precast concrete 12"x12" pyramid looking ones just set on dirt, and some of those are in pretty bad shape.
Any comments here appreciated (I could do without the "pretty stupid" stuff though, heh heh). Comments on stuff like:
Pier requirements - spacing, requirements of concrete footing under piers information, fastening posts to piers, etc.
Spans for beams, etc.
Planning on going 2x6 on 16" centers for floor joist.
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You may need drawings sealed by engineer or architect. I'd start by asking Building Department if they have a written list of submittal requirements. T
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The best source of information is the building department itself. They will tell you what the requirements are, how the plans have to be drawn, and whether or not you need a structural engineer to sign off.
I'm sure there are exceptions, but most building departments and inspectors I've worked with have been helpful --- tell the same story you told us and I'm sure they'll work with you.
Good luck,
Ken
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Mike89 wrote:

As usually with remodeling the deeper you get into it the more work you uncover. It is always a good idea to keep it simple (KISS principle). Not sure why would you want to mess with the joists but I would put 3/4 plywood on the existing joists and problem is solved. Make sure your mark your joists at each end so you know where to nail the plywood. If you 'really' want to do everything by the book then most likely you would have to demolish your existing structure and start from scratch as Building Code changes and it is likely that your house doesn't follow the Code anymore. So my advice would be to nail plywood down 1/2 or 3/4.
Jack JPro Construction
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