Granite Cutout

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crhras wrote:

From what you have posted you will have a BIG mess if you try to do this yourself. You have stated that you are trying to cut a finised moulded cutout in a granite slab for an undermount sink. This means you will have to cut a very precise hole and then mould the edge of this hole with a router and then polish that edge. This will be a very involved process in the field. You can look at routers and bits for this purpose at places like www.masterwholesale.com. They also sell polishing kits/pads and abrasives for the subsequent steps. The router bit alone might cost 400-500 dollars. This process is normally done in a shop with a CNC router. This is not something you do with a hand held woodworking router or a grinder.
If I were you and I were really trying to pull this off on my own I would go for a square edge sink hole. You would need a diamond core bit to match your needed radius at the sink corners (square/rectangular sink), a diamond blade, and a polishing set. It will be a LOT of work and a LOT of mess and will probably result in a substandard result as compared to a shop doing it but that may be acceptable to you. You could punch holes at each corner with the core bit, cut to those holes with a diamond blade, then polish a day or two. The end result could be anything from a disaster to somewhat acceptable.
If the hole needs to be oval, round, or must have a routed edge, I would not even consider doing it.
Mark
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Exactly.
Not only that. Have you considered whether there is clearance for the router and the polishing tools at the backsplash? Those are not small tools.
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Sorry, I didn't mention that this is completely new construction. The slabs will be fabricated in a large garage with access to water, etc. and then installed over the cabinets.
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crhras wrote:

I would say you will still be looking at quite a chore. The only experience I have with the process is having had to cut unfinished edges on a few granite counter tops and the occasional faucet/sprayer hole. I have done a bit of concrete polishing as well.
Like I said before. Perhaps going with a bit more simple shape (square edge, eased) you could perhaps make something work. You have to realize that you will have vast amounts of water (read hundreds of gallons) and the associated slurry to deal with. This grinding and polishing is normally done on a fabricating table which collects this water and slurry to a settling tank for reuse. You could perhaps build a quick grinding table out of ply lined with poly and a shower drain in one end run to a few 55 gallon drums. Pump out of the drums to grind/polish and let them settle out overnight. Set your slabs up on a couple blocks inside the table.
With high quality smooth diamond blades on your saw, a good guide, and water, you could perhaps come out with smoother rough cuts minimizing polishing. Square edges eased would eliminate the need for the routing step. Its a major undertaking but your posts sound like you are determined.
A good trial, and probably the cheapest, would be to go to a granite supplier and ask them if you could buy a few of their scabs (broken corners, scraps, and so on). Take them home and get started. You will have to invest in the equipment for the tests but at least you wont be out the time on the actual pieces and the material if you find its too difficult.
Finding an affordable saw that will allow you to wet cut without getting fried may be a tough one. I have seen small trim saw sized hand held cutters with water feeds for sale at the home centers however with the amount of cutting you will have I would suggest buying them by the dozen and a lot of blades. Perhaps a decent but cheap double insulated circular saw and rig up your own water feed. Buy a pair of insulating rubber gloves and work of a GFI. The GFI will probably trip continuously but you at least wont get fried. Cutting the slabs dry will result in a tremendous amount of grinding and polishing.
Good or bad it would be interesting to hear your results, Mark
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Thank you very much for your comments. I was thinking that I could cut the granite dry and then grind the rounded surfaces before polishing. That's what the granite tool supply shop told me i could do. They should know what they are talking about but you never know. Since you are interested, I will keep the group posted. Probably wont' start this project for a couple more weeks.
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