Gas or 220 Volt?

My Cape Code style 30 year old house is built on a slab in NE Ohio. The lowest level is partially below ground (windows at ground level) where the natural gas furnace and water heater are located. Up six steps is the ground level where the kitchen, dining, living room and foyer are located. Up another eight steps is a level of three bedrooms and bath. Up another six steps is another bedroom with half bath.
The coldest room in the house is the living room which, fortunately, I've had little interest in using over the past 25 years. However, since I'm renovating the house and am entertaining replacing the electric stove that's on the common wall to the living room (we'll call this "wall X"), I'm curious about installing a gas line for the stove and punching an opening in the wall for a gas fireplace in the living room. (There's a wood burning fireplace in the den - lower level.)
There are several approached to delivering more heat to that living room; A) Drive a gas pile under the slab if I change the stove. (B) Run a gas line from the water heater in the furnace room through the wall, into the back of the pantry, continue on the adjacent wall (wall X), and run the pipe at baseboard level which means hugging the frame of a doorway. (C) Run the gas line as just described but stay just below the ceiling to clear the doorway then drop to the baseboard and come out where the stove will connect. (D) Just punch a whole in the wall and go electric fire place.
Option A) If I choose this, I have to deliver a gas pipe under the slab (probably from the furnace room) a distance of about 10' on a diagonal to the center of wall X. That means cutting a hole in the foundation wall in the furnace room, driving a gas pipe under the slab and hoping I hit the target at wall X. Then, cutting a hole in the slab to reach the pipe then making a 90 degree connection to bring the pipe to the surface. Sounds like a lot of work with significant risk. BUT. may be the best route where safety from a gas leak is concerned. Maybe. Need comments.
Option B) It means cutting drywall . but that seems a lot easier than tunneling under the slab. But this may not be advisable if I've got to go through so many turns to get around the doorway.
Option C) If I choose this option, I've got a gas line running in the wall of a kitchen at ceiling level - the hottest level in the room. Code say anything about this? Is this any less safe than option B?
Option D) If I do this, will I need to run a separate 220 line to handle that fireplace? I would assume it's not going to be as easy as simply knocking a hole in the wall and putting in a new outlet that will serve the 220 stove in the kitchen as well as the 220 fireplace in the living room. I would assume running a 220 line would be easier than running a gas pipe. I don't know if I should feel safer with a 220 line in wall X if it were above baseboard level or with a gas pipe. I'm a tad leery of that pipe, but maybe needlessly. Comments?
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Confess I just scanned this but I never saw any mention of a vent for a gas heater. PS You don't want to mix gas and electric. They are a different type of heat and you won't believe how much juice the elect one will burn
Sounds like it is only a few steps from the real furnace. Can't get a duct off it to dump into the cool room?
If the furnace is original, it needs to be replaced anyway to a high efficiency one. (my original was 65%, mine now is 92%) Make it bigger and a better blower on it.

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No vent. Thought I read I didn't need one.
Any new duct would have to make several bends - as is done now - in the furnace room then go under the slab. I already have a booster fan in the duct leading to that living room (which reminds me. The damn thing has become noisy and probably needs replaced.) A new duct under the slab would be MAJOR surgery.
I'm not sure I understand your caution about mixing fuels; it's done all the time among people I know. Space heaters! Gas furnaces... electric space heaters in selected rooms. Maybe their all wrong though... including me. I have two that work well; one in the den and one in the library. Makes for a toasty environment when temperatires dip into the teens and below here. And I don't have to have the whole house involved. I was thinking along the same line for the living room but on a grander scale with a fireplace.
I had my motor relaced on the furnace about three years ago. The guy told me he felt my system was solid. Said the burner was masive and they don't make them like that anymore. Aside from the improved efficeincy, he say no need to change. He did say when that time came (he never told me how I'd know that though) I'd want to get a high efficiency with a three speed blower and it would probably run nearly all the time to cuirculate the air. He told me to try it with what I have by just turning the fan to manual on cold days and keep the air circulating. I've done that and it does seem to make for a more even environment. I also insulated since then - heavily - and my fuel consumption has actually dropped over the past three years quite significantly while the temperature probably inched up just a tad as I aged. Bills are still a little higher but consumption is lower. I did a pretty good job insulating if I have to say so myself. Glad that task is over though. What lung irritant!

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I run mine summer and winter 24/7.
If that big burner is wasting heat and I'll bet it is and you think you will have to replace it in the near future, why not now and get the good out of the more efficiency. You can bet it is cheaper than a couple years from now unless we have a depression and I doubt that so jump on in and save all that money.
I looked int it and didn't go with the two stage furnace either.
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One thing I found is nowadays most electric appliances for the home are a lot more efficient then they used to be. Gas prices being as high as the are elctric is getting better. I live just west of cleveland, Ohio and right on the lake. I had my gas shut off and converted everything to electric. My gas bills over the past few years ran between $180 - $250. Since I switched over to electric.ie..stove, hotwater heater and furnace, I now have one bill and my electric bill has been running around $110. There is alot you can do. The most important I found is to have a good duct system. My house originally was built in 1942 and had the old system with huge ducts ect. I fixed all that, wasnt easy but in the long run saved alot of money. Also instead of using the furnace I put electric base board heaters in the rooms so I can control each room individually because some rooms you dont need heated all the time and they dont always need to be at room temp. By doing this I also saved more money. One draw back is that electric heat does seem to take a bit longer to heat a room. So far the costs have been better then gas. Best thing to do is see how much the gas company is charging you. Anything over like $.50 - $1.00 a therm would make electric much more cost effective. The change ove is definately not cheap especially if you have to hire someone to do it.
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system. My house originally was built in 1942 and had the old system with huge ducts ect. I fixed all that, wasnt easy but in the long run saved alot of money. Also instead of using the furnace I put electric base board

I'm a little confused. Exactly what did you do to the ducts? And why did you do anything at all if you installed electric baseboard heaters?

Sounds like you did some serious calculations since gas is sold by CCF ot MMF (depending upon territory) and KWH for electric. I wouldn't have the foggiest idea of how to accurately measure the cost per therm in my house. How'd you do it?

If it's that expensive, what was your calculated payback period? What % of the bill was material?
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mjb wrote:

JMHO........I really don't see how electric heat can be competitve with gas heat.
The utility has a hugh capital investment & lots of labor that take fuel (nat gas, oil, coal or nuke) turns it into heat to make steam & then through a turbine to make electricity. They send the juice to you where you turn it back into heat?
Eliminate all the steps & just burn the fuel yourself.
Of course whether or not electirc heat is cheaper all depends on
$/kwatt-hr vs $/therm (100,000 btu?)
If a therm is 100,000 btu then 1 Therm equals 29.3 Kwatt-hrs
in SoCal our electric rates range from 12.5c to 25c per Kwatt-hr depending on usage
so gas would have to be more than $3 to $6 respectively per therm to be more expensive than electric heat so unless your electricity cheaper than 25c per kwatt-hr....gas looks cheaper (do you get that cheap hydro juice?)
(I assumed 85% efficient gas appliance & 100% efficient electric appliance)
Gasoline is ~114,000 btu per gallon so @ $2.5 / gallon that would translate to about $2.2/therm
natural gas has to be about in the same ballpark 'cuz BTU's is BTU's
cheers Bob
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