Garage door tracks and ceiling clearance

I read in a thread here that "You need 18" clearance above the door opening to get STANDARD door tracks (15" radius) to install easily."
If I complete the framing of my garage project with two standard top plates I will come up with 15 1/2 inches from bottom of header (including trim) and the bottom of the ceiling joists.
Can anyone tell me if 15" radius will still fit in this 15 1/2 inches or would it be absolutely necessary to go to a 12" radius track? I guess I am focused on the word "easily" in the quote. It is not to hard, either, to just add additional layers of top plate, what? two more courses, to get really close to 18 inches. Might be that is the best solution.
As I write this it occurs to me that in my situation the 15 inch radius track would have to be mounted flush on the surface of the ceiling whereas usually they are mounted on "stand off" brackets, right?
Of course, if I sheetrock the ceiling I loose another 1/2". Also, note that the ceiling joists run parallel to garage door.
I plan on installing 7 ft x 9 ft door(s).
Thanks.
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No big deal. Just use a double track low overhead version. My 16 x 8 works just fine that way.

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I don't know about the standard tracks, but I had my Wayne Dalton 7' doors installed in a garage with an 8' finished ceiling using their low clearance track. There is still about 2" clearance between the tops of the pulleys and brackets to the ceiling, so I guess it could be installed with as little as 10" clearance. I even installed a Genie Pro door opener which just fits in the 2" clearance between the upper arc of the door and the ceiling. It is a very smooth operating door, so I wouldn't shy away from the tight radius tracks.
-- Dennis
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Thanks guys, I think I will forego the additional top plates.
I am going to have a professional install the doors. He tells me that 17" is the optimal clearance. Never said that something less was impossible, just not "optimal".
$350 per door (installed) sounds fair? Yes? No? That is, automatic, powered doors. Non insulated, no windows in the doors.
Again, thank you. Very much.
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My dads place has about 6" of clearance and used standard tracks. The trick is to use a special hinge/roller assy for the top one. I could send a picture of it in a couple of weeks.
--
Steve Barker



"Nunya" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

Steve, thanks for the offer of the picture but I don't think it is necessary.
John
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Got a cheap garage door and accompanying hardware off the shelf at Lowes. I too questioned the clearance thing. My solution was to offset the ceiling 5 1/2" higher above the garage door and all hardware that ties to the ceiling. Since was using 2X6s, was self evident where they would fall in relation to the rest of the ceiling joists. Gave an approximate extra foot in total ceiling width on both sides for effect. A multiple 2X12 beam's bottom falls in the center of the garage at normal ceiling height, which is where the end of the ceiling difference is across the garage. Rafter bottoms were of no consequence regarding clearance of garage door and hardware. 5 on 12 rafters, 2X6s. Just tied the elevated ceiling joists to the rafters, and a 2X6 block cut to fit under the joist, fall over the top plate, and dies just short where the rafter hangs over at top/bottom of rafter. Used a pattern for these blocks in cutting multiples. Had to add one ceiling joist each (2 total) normal height for the transition from elevation in ceiling. Small 20 X 20 garage, 10' joists made it easy for one person to do. Looks awesome.
--
Jonny



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Jonny wrote:

Thank you Jonny,
based on your info and what the others have said I think I got it figured out. The last wall is going up tomorrow.
Then I get to figure out whether to frame the roof myself or go with custom built trusses which I would have to put up by myself. So, I might be back with more questions.
I appreciate the help.
John (Nunya) Hinds
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If the rafters are of reasonable length, much easier for one person to handle compared to trusses. There were 2 heavy items in the project, the beam in the center of the garage (heaviest), and the garage door header. Both 2X12 yellow pine. Had help on the beam lifting to the top plate.
--
Jonny



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If your installing a new door, you may consider low clearance door hardware. Pretty sure that will fit in as low as 6-8" clearance

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