Footings for Shed

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The caveat there is that the 2x12 frame would weigh somewhere between 700 and 800 pounds. Not exactly something that a DIYer would "place" easily, and it's not clear if the OP has help on hand.
Leveling the deck platform for smaller sheds and decks and then pouring the concrete works well, but after a certain point working around the holes and frame just takes more time and presents certain risks. I doubt the OP will be operating at contractor speed, so there's no great time lost by doing the foundation first.
R
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I would not do 2x12. I would do 2x6 @ 2' centers I would probably use 6 piers.......and double up the joist on the ends and middle. Anyway......simple box......pour a slab.......be done. jloomis
wrote:

The caveat there is that the 2x12 frame would weigh somewhere between 700 and 800 pounds. Not exactly something that a DIYer would "place" easily, and it's not clear if the OP has help on hand.
Leveling the deck platform for smaller sheds and decks and then pouring the concrete works well, but after a certain point working around the holes and frame just takes more time and presents certain risks. I doubt the OP will be operating at contractor speed, so there's no great time lost by doing the foundation first.
R
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So you want to go footing and CMUs and beam instead of pier and beam...
Dig the holes, throw in a chair in each hole. Pour the footings and piers (sonobouy or 1X12 cedar form with rebar tied to the chair). Done.
How many footing/piers depends on the anticipated weight it has to support. But that was left out for a negative reply from you or another respondent anyway. I'll bow out here.
--
Dave



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On Apr 15, 8:53 pm, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

Sorry for my ignorance, but what's the 'chair' that you're talking about thowing into each hole?
I talked to the guy at the Project Desk at Lowe's last night and he suggested that I just dig the hole and make a box shaped form out of plywood and put that on top of the hole and pour the concrete into it all. That way I have the square form above ground that will make a nice corner and I don't have to worrry about making and removing a form underground.
What do you guys think about that solution?
I am definitely considering more supports after reading everyone's comments. Better safe than sorry anyways!
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On Apr 16, 8:58 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A chair is a small platform, for lack of a better word, that supports the rebar and keeps it encased in concrete to the depth required by code. Otherwise the rebar rusts and loses its strength.

There are many ways to do it, but you haven't addressed our questions about your zoning and code situation. It's pointless to give advice if it's prohibited construction.
BTW, big box stores are absolutely the last place you should be asking for construction advice. They're notoriously bad and ill-informed. You'd do far better to check out Fine Homebuilding's web site or The Journal of Light Construction. Better yet, hie thee to a library and peruse the home improvement aisle. It'll be time well spent.
R
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I called the county and there's no need to pull a permit for this size shed. The other sheds in my community all have foundations as well. I've seen sheds around where I live that have foundations and some that don't. It's a rural county. I've seen some pretty crazy stuff being built :)
I figured I would ask the guys at Lowe's since I was there getting some stuff anyway. Couldn't hurt.
I did by a book about building sheds. There's plenty of good advice in the book, but they either poured a slab or just set the shed on timber "sleds". They didn't show anything about digging for a foundation like I want to do. I really don't want to build a slab because I am planning on storing stuff under the shed and hiding it with lattice all the way around. It will be a good place to put certain types of things.
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The "chair" is simply a way to hold the rebar up so it ends up in the middle of the concrete instead of laying on the ground (where it would add no strength). You can buy specially made chairs at home centers or other sources, but resting the rebar on a piece of a brick or stone before pouring the concrete usually works just as well.

Have you thought about pouring a slab and building a taller shed with a "loft" floor inside? You could construct the floor at whatever height you want, and still be able to store things under the main floor. This would keep your lower items off the dirt, out of the weather, and away from bugs/thieves.
Just a thought...
Anthony
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I did several sheds in our neighborhood and I just set them on blocks on top of the ground. No foundations. You really do not need a foundation for a small shed.
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On Apr 17, 12:54 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Thats what I did, everyone recomended it and my area goes to -15f, my shed is maybe 9x12, needed no permit, is not taxable. Just every 3 ft or so is a block, its alot easier and cheaper than a footing. I could only see a footing necessary if you wanted to bolt it down because of high winds. The shed is off the ground for air circulation and screening used to keep critters from making nests under it.
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wrote:

Thats what I did, everyone recomended it and my area goes to -15f, my shed is maybe 9x12, needed no permit, is not taxable. Just every 3 ft or so is a block, its alot easier and cheaper than a footing. I could only see a footing necessary if you wanted to bolt it down because of high winds. The shed is off the ground for air circulation and screening used to keep critters from making nests under it.
------
I agree. Its all depends on the slope, if any, and soil conditions. "Blocks" are easiest to seat in both level, square, and so forth. Whether these "blocks" walk later depends on what I just stated before.
So, just because one solution works for one individual and their situation does not mean it will work for another person and their own situation. That is a dangerous implicaiton if that's what's being implied.
Whether a shed "blows away" due to high winds has little to do with its foundation. A building, including a shed, is most likely to be decapitated, then the walls go due to high winds. Am assuming the shed has adequate weight due to itn internal storage matter in this instance.
--
Dave



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Sorry for my ignorance, but what's the 'chair' that you're talking about thowing into each hole?
----------
Start from the beginning, I assume you understand what pier is, and a sonobouy as well.
A "chair" is what a pier sits on to prevent side to side walking or sinking.. Its made of rebar covered by concrete. The "chair" has emanations of rebar, integral to the rebar in the chair, above it as part of the pier itself.. The pier is then formed up and poured over this same rebar emantions from the "chair" below. A sonobouy can be substituted but must use the same rebar emanations from the "chair".
Contrary to Rico's thing on rust. Nothing could be further from the truth. No significant rebar rust can occur using the method I mentioned, but has nothing to do with the purpose of a "chair". A "chair" is more lilkely to be used if the soil can't support the pier as in fractured rock, soft soils or sand. Hillside foundation is also a factor in choosing a "chair".
"Chairs" are available for sale. They can easily be created on-site if you're into cutting rebar and tying same. Its easier to make a "chair" specifically for your needs rather than purchasing a generic "chair" and working your way around that chair with mods and so forth for tying into the pier or sonobuoy. Typically, in an on-site "chair" fabrication, the hole is dug and the chair is "thrown" into the hole. Concrete is poured on the rebar chair. The rebar emantions for the pier are adjusted for plumb and square with the anticipated foundation prior to the pour. A couple of days later, the pier is formed up and poured..
A simple footer below the frost line may be ample. I don't know your locale and soil and elevation slope specifics. Not knowing that, I tend to overkill based on the unknown. Read A_S_S_U_M_E.
--
Dave
April 16th, 2009 Day 1 post Tea Party.
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Dave, Your ramblings clearly show your ignorance of reinforced concrete construction. NO reinforcing steel should be closer than 3" to the subgrade or closer than 2" to an exposed surface. When rebar rusts it expands and causes the concrete to fail; the expansion of the steel caused by oxidation or expansive rust creates more force than the tensile strength of concrete can overcome. This is the reason highway agencies all across the country specify epoxy coated rebar for decks, parapets and any other concrete exposed to the weather and or chlorides. That means NO calcium chloride when it gets chilly.
Rico attempted to be helpful and your info to the OP was ill advised at best.
Tom "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote in message

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All true except your self-declared ignorance rantings, regardless that is not the purpose of a "chair". Believe that was the question I responded to.
--
Dave

"Tom Cular" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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