Footer/Base for outdoor fireplace

I'm going to install a concrete footer/base for an outdoor fireplace. The specs say this footer/base must be able to hold 1500 lbs. I haven't received the fireplace yet, so I don't have the full specs/ directions (I do have the dimensions), I want to get started on the footer before it gets real cold. My questions are:
1) The Fireplace itself is 2' x 4.5' , what should the dimensions of the footer/base be?
2) How thick does this footer/base have to be?
3) Do I need a real footer, like a deck footer below the freeze line?
4) It's going to be right next to my patio, should I tie it into the patio (which is only 5" thick) or just pour it next to it?
Thank you
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 14:47:10 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Where are you located?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Forgot to mention that, I'm in Washington, DC.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 18:11:47 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd go down about 2.5 feet for the footings, to get below frost line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why? If I read right it's a freestanding fireplace out by the patio. Pour a slab on the surface 4 or 5 inches thick maybe 6 inches bigger than the fireplace. Put a little rebar in it just to keep it together. So it floats with frost. Let it. So does your patio. Sometimes we tend to go overboard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I missed the free standing part...

Aaaahhhh thud.
Who took the water out?
Let it float then.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Big grin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 12, 4:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

A couple of things, from my limited knowledge:
You really only need to go down below the frost line for the dwelling unit foundation and things attached to it. Typically soils are expected to support at least 1500 lbs per square foot, so the size of the base shouldn't be a huge deal. I wouldn't tie it into the patio, since the base and patio might "heave" differently with the frost in the winter. As for how thick, I really don't know. A couple pcs of rebar wouldn't hurt...
JK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 12, 5:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Larger than the fireplace - how much larger is up to you. You can treat the base as an extension of the patio with additional room, or just make it the same size as the footprint of the fireplace if that's all you need and want.

That depends on what it's made out of and whether you want to build for the ages.

That depends on your soil conditions, and how you build the base. I wouldn't go down three feet for such a light load. I'd excavate a bit deeper and compact some crushed stone or other drainage material under the slab or pavers. That should take care of the frost heaving. If the fireplace sits on feet, I'd probably go with a slab. If it's on a continuous base and your patio is built of pavers, I'd probably go with pavers.

Well, I guess your patio is a concrete slab. Now the question becomes whether you want the extension to appear seamless (it won't no matter what you do), or if you want to set off the base.
Basically, it's entirely your call as it's primarily aesthetics. Contact the manufacture and find out if there is a photo gallery so you can get some ideas of how other people dealt with it.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.