Finger Jointed 2 x 8

I am remodeling my house and have discovered a valley rafter that was sagging because it was made up of several 2 x 8" scabbed together with a 1 x 8 on one side. The valley rafter is 28' long. The only 2 x 8 that I can find that long is a finger jointed one. Is a finger jointed 2 x 8 (douglas fir) suitable for a valley rafter?
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spebby snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

2000 International Building Code (published by International Code Council) Section 2303.1.1:
"Approved end-jointed lumber is permitted to be used interchangeably with solid-sawn members of the same species and grade."
# 2000 International Residential Code for One- and Two-Family Dwellings (published by International Code Council) contains three separate references.
Floor Framing, Section R502.1.3: "Approved end-jointed wood identified by a grade mark conforming to Section R501.2 may be used interchangeably with solid-sawn members of the same species and grade."
Wall Framing, Section R602.1.1: "Approved end-jointed wood identified by a grade mark conforming to Section R602.1 may be used interchangeably with solid-sawn members of the same species and grade."
Roof Framing, Section R802.1.2: "Approved end-jointed wood identified by a grade mark conforming to Section R802.1 may be used interchangeably with solid-sawn members of the same species and grade."
However, remember that this is a MINIMUM standard. A valley rafter is subjected to some heavy loading in certain instances and I would perhaps be more inclined to use two 14' pieces with an intermediate support. You can support this in the middle if you can go down to a wall. Getting the old one out and a new one in is going to be your major job on this one.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Robert Allison wrote:

What he said...
If have a jacking point(s) to raise it, I'd be tempted to do that, pull the 1x scab and scab 2x of longest span could get there and optionally add a 3/4" ply on the other side. Adequately glued and nailed, of course...
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And maybe a vertical support near the point of jacking.
s

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Thanks Robert for the quick reply. The valley rafter crosses a load bearing wall (ceiling joists lapped at this wall) and a non-load bearing wall (parallel to joists). If crosses the load bearing wall at 6' and the non-load bearing wall close to the center of the valley rafter. Can the valley rafter be supported by the non-load bearing wall? Currently, there are no supports.
Any tips on an easy way to remove the existing valley rafter? My plan is to add some temporary bracing and use a nail puller to remove the nails from the jack rafters, remove the existing rafter and insert the new one. I have removed the roof sheating in this area.
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spebby snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

With the sheathing removed, use a sawzall with a long blade (demo blade) to cut the nails at each jack, plate, ridge, etc. Then you can cut up the old rafter to get it out more easily. Don't forget the fascia and possibly sheetrock may be nailed to this also.
Then install your new rafter or rafter parts and use plywood on both sides to scab them together using glue and nails. Then run your intermediate support down to the non load bearing wall and brace as necessary. I would run a 2x4 cut at the angle of the rafter under the rafter and another beside it. Nail them together and to the upper plate of your wall and the side of the rafter. If the wall you are using for the support is not directly under the joint of the two parts of your rafter, nail a 2x4 flat to the bottom of the rafter and then place the support under that.
The difference between a bearing and a non bearing wall is (generally) that the bearing wall is being used to support something. The non-load bearing is not. It doesn't mean it is not capable of bearing a load. (But it may be less capable if it is framed 2' OC. A brace will cause no problems, though.)
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I would use engineered lumber (microllam or parallam) for anything that needs to be long and strong.
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Thanks all for the prompt replies. I am not sure which method I will use, it depends on several factors. I will check the availability of engineered lumber in my location. I need to get the roof closed as soon as possible before the project turns into a bigger project. It's raining this morning and so far the tarp is working. This item was unexpected. I will post the solution I used when I finish the project, probably next week.
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One more idea:
Leave the existing valley in location and add the strengthening beam under it. Scab or bolt through 2x4 strapping on each side to keep it in plane. Perhaps it can span the existing splices. Brace to walls wherever possible.
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I would add to check for the following grademarks, "CERT EXT JNTS" and make certain that it is NOT marked "VERTICAL USE ONLY" (indicating that it is intended for compressive loads only).
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