Extending existing wall studs

I am working on completing drawings for a home in the east end of Toronto. I am showing the existing roof being taken off to facilitate adding a second floor. The existing wood stud walls must be extended to satisfy an owner request for additional headroom.
Does anyone have a suggestion, or can refer me to a previous post where wall studs are extended up, or a short stud wall is added and securely attached to the lower stud wall without having to replace the existing wall studs?
Thankyou in advance.
Scott.
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Aren't you working with an engineer?
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MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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In a previous post sw wrote...

Don't mess with it. If this is platform framing then remove the studs to the second floor and install new ones.
Otherwise, contact a local engineer for advice.
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co.
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Bob Morrison wrote:

A healthy bead of wood glue and some perforated plumbers tape screwed across the stud/plate connections wouldnt suffice?
Mark
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In most cases, framing one wall directly on top of the other would create a pivot point. It would act sort of like a large hinge. Strong winds or seismic forces could easily cause the wall to bend (and possibly fail) at the point where the two walls meet.
If this wall extends unsupported from the first floor to the second, you should tear it out and reframe with continuous studs. Then add fireblocking every 8' or so in the studbays.
If you can't remove the existing wall for some reason, you could probably sister full height studs next to the existing shorter studs. But, that's probably more work than just reframing the wall.
Anthony
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In a previous post HerHusband wrote...

I could see this being the case if the wall is balloon framed. The number of fasteners required will depend on the loads.
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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I think you've answered my question. I believe it's best to sister a new 2"X6" wd stud wall to the existing 2"X4". I"ll widen the base plate to accept. We need the extra depth to obtain the min required insulation anyways. I should clarify that there is no second floor yet, just a roof. It's an existing bungalow whose roof we're removing. You were very helpful in this, thankyou once again.
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you could build your mini wall like you are saying & add light gage steel gussets to each side if you think saving the existing is worth the trouble.

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hmmm. more or less a kind of strapping on the face of the joist. I think that the nice thing about sistering new 2x6's to the existing 2x4 is that I have more room to achieve the r value im going to need. Good suggestion though. Thanks
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Code won't allow extending studs this way for seismic and wind reasons. The failure is known as "hinging", where the original top plate rocks off the studs. However, you can support the extension with angled supports between the new floor joists and original top plate. This would create a strong triangle that would prevent hinging, and so the planning department would likely accept this to stabilize the stem wall without additional engineers ink. The other approach would be to have a truss company design floor trusses (they have their own engineers) that would sit on the original top plate, but which are designed to have added ceiling clearance below. Otherwise as said, you'll need an engineer, and many engineers aren't too good at this sort of design work it seems to me. They are more used to figuring out the basics of load on conventional foundation and beam situations. But, if you are building up, you may need an engineer to ensure the existing foundation can take the load.

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I forgot to add that the angle support idea would result in an unusual interior ceiling around the perimeter, so that the 2x4 wood brackets would need to be placed 16" on center for the wall board to attach to. The space would be a good place to route HVAC ducts, water pipes, or electrical wire. But then again if the ceiling/floor joists extend out over the exterior for a sizeable overhang, these angle brackets could be on the exterior and perhaps hidden in an architectural facade of some sort.

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