Exhaust Vent on 1st Floor Bathroom

I have a 2 story home and want to add a bathroon (exhaust) vent to the bathroom on the 1st floor. I need to get some advice on whether this is do-able or not. And if so how? I'm sure every scenario is different but a general idea would help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, I doubt that you want to pump it into the bedroom upstairs (unless it is a guest/mother-in-law room) so you will have to find a common wall to get it to the attic or go out the side. Either way isn't choice but that is your only 2 options. Unless you can pump it into a crawl space below the bathroom.
They make wall mounted fans that will dump through the wall and from your description, that is really your only option. Also through the ceiling joists and out
Cut a hole in the outside wall, run wire to it, run a timer switch to it. Really, is it worth it???? I don't think so either.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Years ago you cut a hole in the window glass and fitted a fan in that. This isn't possible these days as the windows use sealed double glazed units. You can howver buy extractor fans designed to extract through a hole in the wall.
In the UK something like this range http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 0593
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Run a vent up to the attic via the wall if workable. Don't know your floor plan in relation to 1st floor and 2nd floor.
Opening a window after/during the shower/bath may work as well. If no window, forgive my assumption. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 29, 3:13 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

First, this is very do-able. Second, you must vent directly to the outside, whether you vent through the attic or wall, to meet today's code requirements.
(IRC Section M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors. Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl space.)
If you choose the floor/ceiling space method (which I would recommend). First you must determine the direction of floor/ceiling joist and the distance of the run. Then check the distance of run vs. the fan mfg. requirements. then install per mfg. requirements.
If you choose the roof vent option. First you must determine the wall position on the floor above so that you can locate the fan close to that wall. Then you must open the ceiling of the bathroom and the wall of the floor above to cut through the top and bottom plates (If this is a bearing wall additional steps may be needed). Then you must make a penetration in the roof assembly according to the roofing manufacturers requirements. Then install the fan and duct per mfg. requirements.
As you see, the first option is less intrusive and requires fewer repairs to the interior finish.
Hope this helps! Terry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Take a look at the following link:
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/print/0,17071,689843,00.html
This may be of help in determining whether or not you want to take on the project yourself or hire someone to do it for you. Just be sure that the duct is vented to the outside as others have stated here.
Hope this helps.
Peter.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.