Eroding Dirt Foundation of Concrete Slab

We had a slab built a few years ago and the builders simply built-up the earth to support a even slab, there are no concrete foundations...only dirt. The dirt is now eroding from around the perimeter of the slab leaving its corners hanging in the air. Anything I can do to repair this? Advice is greatly appreciated.
Jack.
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I'd talk to an engineer before doing anything. You might need to just replace the dirt, and you might need to do something drastic.
Speculation: Replace the dirt, then build a retaining system with concrete block.
Get thee to a foundation contractor.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Firemedic had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/construction/Re-Eroding-Dirt-Foundation-of-Concrete-Slab-14378-.htm : I have a 3' x 6' aggregate slab that holds 2 - 3-ton HVAC units. With our Southern soil, the clay-dirt has settled and/ or eroded underneath the pad over time (10+ years). Will placing supports of treated lumber (railroad ties, etc.) or steel with concrete support be sufficient or would you suggest excavating around the pad, building a block footer wall and then filling the void with concrete? Additionally, the pad does not currently show any signs of stress (cracks, fractures, etc.) and no signs of tilting or potential collapse.
Thank you.
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On 19 Nov 2008 16:19:44 GMT, brian.moat_at_comcast_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (Firemedic) wrote:

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You may want to post some images of what the slab looks like, because I can't quite see how you are getting your erosion. Is it on a slope? If so then a retainer (personally I'd go for cement/block over wood) would make sense.
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Where are you located? The freeze/defrost cycle might be a cause of the errosion.
Hul

http://www.thestuccocompany.com/construction/Re-Eroding-Dirt-Foundation-of-Concrete-Slab-14378-.htm
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"Jack King" wrote...

You didn't mention what the slab is used for. If there is no significant load applied where the erosion is taking place, you could get away with replacing the dirt. You need to install some sort of drainage system around the perimeter, assuming that water is causing the erosion.
--
hawgeye



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First, Slap the contractor.......What a nice guy..... I even put a small footing in a 3x4 stair pad just for that reason.....
The only thing you can do is undermine the exterior slab along the perimeter and fill the area with concrete either by building a form and or external footing with block. You may have to make the form or block wall 3" away from the slab inorder to "pump" the concrete into the area..... You should get the "Builder" to do this for you. It may help teach him a lesson. I would also say an easier way would be to build a retaining wall with PT fir. and backfill to the bottom of the slab and compact the earth..... Depends on what you want to see. Concrete is more permanent. jloomis

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