drywall installation

I've got a concrete block house in FL. I've stripped the drywall off the interior walls, 3/4" furring strips remain. I would like to insulate the walls. What's the best way to do this?
I was wondering if I could attach rigid insulation across the furring strips (leaving an air gap between the insulation and block). And then apply the drywall directly to the insulation.
Is this possible and worth it in FL.
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buildstrong had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/construction/drywall-installation-17175-.htm :
[URL=http://www.i80equipment.com /]Boom Trucks[/URL] ------------------------------------- bmancanfly wrote: I think you'll really only need to put vapor barriers on the walls if you plan on furring out the basement walls and then adding insulation, which probably isn't necessary for just a storage space. The reason for that would be more to protect the walls from moisture generated *inside* the space condensing in the wall space than from moisture travelling from outside, which may not be much of an issue anyway. If you want to go ultra-super bombproof on everything though, you might as well do it.
Typically, wood floors installed over concrete slabs on sleepers as you're thinking of doing will have a barrier between the sleepers and the plywood, and a concrete slab will just about always have a vapor barrier underneath it. So I'd probably do that one.

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On May 5, 10:19 am, buildstrong009_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (buildstrong) wrote:

You are giving bad advice. You don't understand about climate, location and vapor barrier location. Visit the Building Science web site and read up.

Oh, really? A concrete slab will "just about always" have a vapor barrier? When was the OP's house built? Right, I don't know either as he didn't tell us, so you're making a big assumption and it's also a bad assumption.
Instead of giving bad advice based on bad assumptions, why not tell the OP where to go for information, or what to do to see if there is a moisture problem with the slab?
BTW, the best advice I can give you and the OP is to choose a better newsgroup portal. Censoring and promulgating bad advice seems to be the specialty of the one you are using. Yes, Mr. Spamming Moderator, I'm talking about you.
R
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I'd have to agree with RIco.
It appears to me you're 0 for 2. .....or is that 0 for 3 or 4? :(
Sorry but I classify your reply is wrong / non-responsive.
cheers Bob
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On 05 May 2009 14:19:04 GMT, buildstrong009_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (buildstrong) wrote:

You clearly don't understand the OP's post, so how anyone can consider your reply as authorative is beyond me. He said *NOTHING* about basement walls. He's talking living area walls.

The OP said nothing about storage space. Again you go off on things that just are not in the original post.

Where in the OP's post did he say 'floors'?

(more sucko company spam and junk...)
To the OP:
1. Drop the sucko company access. Go to a Usenet provider!
2. Yes you will need vapor barrier.
3. Yes it will make a difference.
4. Personally, I'd cut the rigid insulation to fit between the strips myself. I prefer not giving up interior space if not necessary.
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On May 5, 9:21 am, brettgiardiello_at_bellsouth_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (bmancanfly) wrote:

I'd look into stripping the furing strips off, adding a vapor barrier and farming it out with 2x3 or 2x4 follwed with convertional insulation. You've gone to all the trouble of tearing out the wallboard might as well do the rest right. I know you don't have a heating issue but ac costs can be pretty high down there.
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You might consider having the block wall foam filled. They or you will need to drill a lot of small diameter holes for injection. It will maximize the R factor. My next choice would be the dead air, rigid foam, taped and sealed, and drywall.
This would make some good reading: http://www.buildingscienceconsulting.com/designsthatwork/mixedhumid/section2/index.html
If you are Ocala or north, I would think you would want to look at the mixed humid situation.
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Dan,
Two thoughts. I'm not sure that foam filling, after the fact, will be cost effective. Labor intensive, lot's of drilling and patching of holes afterwards.
(Your comments on the 'next choice' are good...)
Also, however, I don't see Ocala/north as a major factor. I'd be more worried about 'local' humidity (coastal) than just saying north of Ocala. (BTW, I lived in Pasco county for some years in the 60s, and in the tropics for about half my life.)
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Foam filling is done after the fact on brand new work. The holes just aren't an issue, especially if you are applying a new interior finish - they are already plugged with foam. My Ocala comment had to do with exposure to freezing or cold temperatures.
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Duh... How right! Not sure what I was thinking there.

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On May 5, 8:21 am, brettgiardiello_at_bellsouth_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (bmancanfly) wrote:

Whats this stucco co bs group, I see alot of this crap now. Anyway, you dont drywall on foam, think, its to soft. If you are asking a question like this you really need pro help.
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