Driving Nails Inside 18" Footing

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How would I or anyone else know like me know the grade of PT lumber used after a long period of time in years?
You can say anything on that basis, as you know we don't have one in that regard. So, that's exactly what you're doing. We can only state our observations. That, I will continue to do without restraint or owing proof of some sort that you know we can't substantiate.
But, neither can you prove to me and the rest of the readers of the lifetime of your deck and supports and so forth. Nor do I question it, as there is no way you can prove that. Its too bad you don't see the difference in this perspective....

Navy 20 year + retiree here. The pier supports are visibly rotting at the time they're normally replaced in reference to what I said before. I won't comment on federal or state landlubber employees at this time except to say that you sure sound like one. God help us, my opinion based on observation of your replies.

Uhh, you used a weblink example where a bridge crossing wetlands has its PT supports in concrete to support your point. And, the concrete terminated right at soil level. Smells awfully like riding the fence here, my observation.
Concrete is porous, water leaks by and gets in the wood. The wood gets wet, etc. etc. etc. Doesn't matter if its PT or not. The organisms enter from the top of the concrete termination. That's where, PT fence posts for instance rot/degrade. Doesn't matter if the fence post or support are loose in the concrete or not, it will happen if near or below the soil line. Good digression attempt, but not valid.
I am not arguing. I am stating facts and my observations. I'm not making an emmotional issue as you previously impled by "arguing", reemphasized. Oh well, you just don't get it, and never will.
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"Grasshopper" <NONE> wrote in message

Wow, you really don't get around. Its mandatory in the industry for each piece of lumber, to have a retention sticker on it. Every retention sticker I've ever seen is plastic. Its common practice, to put the sticker end in the ground.

I provided a link to MD code for _decks_. What more proof do you want? Of course, the point flew right over your head. Now you bring it up again. It's substantiated, good grief.

We do piers here, when they are required. You're the one trying to shove a _Texas_ way of doing things down someones throat.
I never said lifetime, please show where I said lifetime.
You know, guys like you have every episode of This Old House on cd, you watched a home being built, and now you think you're a know it all. Your colors were obvious from the beginning.
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Give me a break.... I do not have to know all the chemical additives in materials at the hardware and lumber store. I am not a chemist, I am a builder, and have been one for many years.... Many houses, foundations, you name it.
There are common grades sold, and for garden use, and there are more advanced grades sold.....PT Fir. I have ordered it special order, cooked and serated, or plain....I have ordered it clear, #1 fir. For crying out loud, you act like the God of Pressure treated lumber....... I can get any grade specified by the plan. If it is a residential application, the plan will state what grade to use. If it is a federal or state job, it will specifiy.....I will order that....... I have enough information to keep me busy with all the hardware, ditch depth, roof pitch, truss delivery, concrete mix.....new fire codes, earthquake, tempered window, stair riser, bituthane, bitumin, hardy board, hardi backer....
I give.
With this comment.....I had to let some steam off.... "If you're attempting to pass yourself off as a contractor, you damn well should know specifications,product knowledge, and the limits of what you are using.
jloomisconcrete and construction.....building fine homes and many construction projects...since 1970 .

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Not in Calif. Although we have built several pole barns with treated lumber when it comes to residential construction, the building dept. requires all wood to have a ground clearance. It is only a better way to build. I have seen treated lumber turn and wrot in the ground. john

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Look, right now Calif is the joke of the states. So, I wouldn't be trying to brag about it.
LOL... A better way to build, huh? Isn't CA where they have all the collapses?
Exactly how was the treated lumber treated? Was it meant for ground contact?
Look, what do you think ground contact means? LOL ... Good grief!
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Same here in the UK. The only wood you might allow in the ground is oak.
Several ways to raise the wood out of the ground depending on what you want it to look like...
a) Find some 18" pipe (or make some formers) and pour the concrete so the top is around 8" out of the ground, or
b) Make the concrete level with the ground, push a SS bolt in head first and use SS metal fittings to raise the post...
http://www.mcfeelys.com/img/stainless-steel-post-SDB-0144.jpg
c) Concrete just below ground level then build a plynth made from bricks capped with 45 degree plynth bricks (and perhaps a bit of lead to prevent frost damage). This isn't the finest brick work but you get the idea..
http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/9868/img1773s.jpg
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Cabot wrote:

.40 is for "Non-critical components" (UC4A) Pole barns, permanent foundations, etc. require .60. (or better)
Depending on your location, code may allow burial of .40. Then again, code is a minimum, not optimal, standard.
When practical, I like to keep wood above ground. From the top of the footing to 2" above grade is 18". At 10" diameter, that's .8 ft^3 per post. At 8" diameter, it's .52 ft^3 That's not much, even when hand mixing.
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