Drip edge discouraged

Page 1 of 2  
Hi,
I am getting reroofing bids for my 25 year old house in Northern Virginia, and I have gotten conflicting advice regarding installation of drip edge.
The first roofer told me he does not recommend installing it because it is not necessary when the shingles are installed properly, and can cause the shingles not to lay straight if the underlying roof structure has irregularities.
The second roofer said that was nonsense, and they always install drip edge.
Both of these roofers have highest ratings in a local consumer ratings service (Washington Checkbook).
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks.
GB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GB wrote:

I'm with the second roofer. If the roof structure is so "irregular" that drip edge won't lay flat, then you've got a bigger problem than just needing shingles.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In a previous post Matt Whiting wrote...

I second Matt's recommendation. The previous owner of my house did not install drip edge and now I have water blowing back against the edge of the sheathing. So, I'm going to figure out a way to retroactively install the drip edge.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you take a look during the rain at a drip edge installed, you will quickly see how much rain it sheds that would have contacted the wood and seeped in. Put them under the builder's paper (or adhesive membrane) along the eaves (where the gutter is), and over the paper along the gable edges.
--
Dennis


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Drip edges perform a necessary function. All the information about drip edge installation is right on the wrapper of _every_ bundle of shingles, and it makes me wonder what other manufacturer's instructions the first roofer doesn't think he needs to follow.
I had a similar situation with an excellent roofer. He said the drip edge wasn't necessary and he never installed it. I told him I required it even if he didn't, so he put it in. Don't throw out the first roofer for this one little item.
BTW, if the underlying roof structure is irregular the shingles won't lay right with or without the drip edge.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote:

The problem is: if he doesn't know about drip edge, what else about roofing doesn't he know? Personally, I'd move along down the road to the next roofer.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've seen it done both ways. Without a drip edge the roofers tend to start the first shingle overhanging a bit more. That starts to curl over time, giving a sloppy appearance, esp. if no gutters. On the other hand, I've seen galvanized speed-rusting ant the break of a drip. Not pretty.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, here's an option. I'm in the process of having some roofs redone and my roofer told me the same thing - no need for the drip edge. He said he's using ice and water shield that hangs over the edge so that the drip edge would be extraneous.
Interestingly, in researching this, I saw conflicting information. One article said install drip edge before the ice/water shield, the other said, absolutely, it has to be installed after. hmm...
It does seem that logically one should use a drip edge. Wish we had this discussion a week ago!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Astro wrote:

The fact is that, just as Rico said, drip edge performs a neccesary function. I would say many more than a single function. We have all seen homes with no drip edge and no problems but we have more often seen them with no drip edge and the subsequent, predictable, problems. Many things can affect the balance, the amount of shingle overhang, type of underlayment, pitch, climate region, and other things can affect whether problems will or will not occur.
What I find even more interesting is how do those who omit drip edge expect to deal with the transition from fascia to the underside of the roof. This is rarely a dead straight clean transition. The drip simply crisps up the whole transition.
Ask any gutter installer what they have to say about overhangs and drip edge and I would wager the vast majority will tell you they have far more trouble with gutters on a roof with no drip edge than one with it. It simply gets water off the fascia which is just what you want.
I am with Matt on this one, unless you have a personal relationship with the roofer, if they are trying to cut the drip edge I would be wary of what else they are willing to cut along the way.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Astro wrote:

Drip edge protects the edge of the sheathing/top of the fascia board as well as helping to keep water from running under the edge of the shingles. Ice & Water shield helps with the latter, but not with the former ... unless he is wrapping the shield around the sheathing and stapling it to the fascia!
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/construction/Drip-edge-discouraged-6787-.htm Malcolm wrote: I'm in the process of getting reroofing estimates. The two companies I'm interested in are approximately $800 apart in their bids: the more expensive one includes drip edge on eaves and gable ends as well as "valley iron," and the other company does not. Both companies have good reputations in town.
Reading this entire thread has convinced me that drip edge is a good idea, but is $800 for it (plus valley iron) excessive? (The footprint for the house is 2400 sq. ft.)Perhaps I should just ask the cheaper company to add the drip edge plus valley iron for an additional cost?
Any advice would be appreciated. Malcolm
RicodJour wrote:

-------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/30/2011 2:41 AM, Malcolm wrote:

> responding to > http://www.homeownershub.com/construction/Drip-edge-discouraged-6787-.htm > Malcolm wrote: > > I'm in the process of getting reroofing estimates. The two companies I'm > interested in are approximately $800 apart in their bids: the more > expensive one includes drip edge on eaves and gable ends as well as > "valley iron," and the other company does not. Both companies have good > reputations in town. > > Reading this entire thread has convinced me that drip edge is a good idea, > but is $800 for it (plus valley iron) excessive? (The footprint for the > house is 2400 sq. ft.)Perhaps I should just ask the cheaper company to add > the drip edge plus valley iron for an additional cost? > > Any advice would be appreciated. > Malcolm > >
Uh, separate the "valley iron" (what is that?) from the drip edge. Now see where the expenses are. I don't think drip edge is what is $800, it more likely is the valley treatment.
--
I'm never going to grow up.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The drip edge is a great idea, but the valley flashing may not be as necessary since most roofers will weave a valley. Since I cannot see the roof, I am not sure what type of valley we are speaking about and some valleys require metal flashing. I just finished my roof and used 16 square of roofing, and the flashing cost was 880.00 I of course had 6 skylights, and edge flashing in the mix. I like the edge flashing that goes out about 1 1/4" and returns back with a drop over the facia of about 1". On the lower eaves I do the pitch bend and on the facia running up the rake it is straight out and back. I researched this, and the flashing helps keep the water from coming in at the edges and keeps the plywood dry.
In a bid like this, I would consider the more "educated" bid that uses edge metal since the contractor is looking at details. I would also ask he he can "weave" the valleys. just my 2 cents. Oh, in some cases we do use copper flashing also....Which raises the price considerably. I also like to paint the galvanized flashing before installation. john
"Malcolm" wrote in message wrote:

-------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Drip edge's are not required by code (IRC), but the code does require that asphalt shingles be installed per manufacturers instructions. All asphalt shingle manufacturer's belong to and follow the guidelines of the Asphalt Shingle Manufactures Association (ARMA); and in their "Residential Asphalt Roofing Manual" they state that "the use of a drip edge is strongly recommended". Hence, the first roofer is correct, it IS NOT actually required, but, have drip edges installed even if it costs more.
The proper method is usually described on the shingle wrapper, but if not, its installed directly to the deck along the eaves, and over the underlayment on the rakes. Also carefully review the underlayment quoted. On my last reroof I had them use the self-adhering type over the complete roof and feel it's well worth the slight extra cost. (Even when the shingles lift water will not get to the deck.)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was of the opinion that in different areas of the country, they do things differently. I have seen roofers put shingles on plywood, with no felt, nor drip edge. I think it was the Carolinas or Virginia. It was 15 or 20 yeas ago. I always thought Felt, and Drip edge would have been mandatory. Not to mention valley metal too, even with a weave.
--
please reply to bargerw NO @ SPAM bellsouth.net and remove the NOSPAM


"GB" < snipped-for-privacy@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The cost of drip edge can't be more than $1/linear foot installed. What's the big deal?
There are plenty of good reasons to use it and none (that I can think of) to omit it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Used to be $1 / foot. Have you priced metal lately? 5 years ago a stick was 2, maybe 3 dollars. Now it is more like $10. Guess it costs allot of freight to get it here from China.
--
please reply to bargerw NO @ SPAM bellsouth.net and remove the NOSPAM


"John Reddy" < snipped-for-privacy@contbuilding.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

The standard 10' drip edge at Home Depot is $3.89 today.
--
Dennis


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Got mine from a roofing supply house. It was over $8 per stick. (3X3) The stuff HD has is not the same as I get.
--
please reply to bargerw NO @ SPAM bellsouth.net and remove the NOSPAM


"DT" < snipped-for-privacy@SPAMwowway.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't you think that silver plated is a little extreme?
Just basing that on the price of course.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.