drainage question

some books I have read say slope the drain toward daylight. what is the purpose of 'toward daylight' ? Thanks, Paul
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In a previous post PaulS wrote...

So that the water spills out onto the ground away from whatever it is you are trying to drain.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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right you wouldn't want it to slope towards the house or the barn

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The very best solution to all drainage issues is move the water away on the surface with enough slope to move and keep it away from your "stuff".
In an ideal piped system you would always like to drain runoff water to daylight. This is often difficult or impossible due to the geography of your property, there may simply be nowhere to allow gravity to take the water and discharge it above ground or the distance to do so is prohibitive. The next best solution would to send runoff to a major storm system. Another alternative would be to take it to a good functioning drywell. The worst scenario might take water to a mechanical lift or sump of some type.
When a properly sized pipe ends in daylight, the only thing that can go wrong is having the daylight end under flood waters or a blockage caused by pipe failure or critters. The city storm can be overpowered, drywells can become saturated or overpowered, and mechanical lifts fail when needed most (one of Murphy's laws) either due to power failure. equipment failure, or inadequate sizing.. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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That's 'second-worst.'
The worst scenario was the lake in my basement every winter before I dug a catchbasin and installed a sump pump. Now my basement has been completely dry for three winters, including our recent visit from the "pineapple express."
http://www.canleyworks.com/projects/drainage /
-Mark
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Thanks for the reply, I think I was reading about drainage systems underground at the footer level. That's why I didn't understand what the author was talking about "daylight". Are you saying that ideally such a system would drain downhill to ground level? The house would have to be located on a hill for that to work. It looks like that is your point. Correct? My basement gets water sometimes. I was thinking about excavating down to the footer and installing drains. A trench for the storm drain is about 3 feet below grade in my area. So I couldn't use gravity to put the water in the storn drain. Maybe a sump pump, but if the line was above ground I would have to cross a sidewalk. Any ideas? Let me know if more info is necessary. Thanks again, Paul

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In a previous post PaulS wrote...

Sounds like a sump pump will be required. Many jurisdictions will let you place the discharge pipe under the sidewalk and through the curb. I refer to these as "tire washers" or "rat showers".
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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Yes, it requires quite a change in grade as in hillside or built along the river, or many feet above the street. Enough that a pipe that is lower than your basement can be sloped down hill and still spill out somewhere, as in the street.
It looks like that is your

Perimeter drain (*French drain". area drain, trench drain, kinda all the same thing) that is lower than your basement floor needs to be able to shed water somewhere. If you can't make grade with the pipe to street, storm, gully, river bank, or fantastic drywell then your next choice would be a mechanical sump. Most municipalities will not knowingly allow you to pipe storm water into a sanitary sewer system, so now you need to pump the water somewhere. All the choices are still the same, you just have the water flowing in a pipe at quite a bit higher elevation at the high end.
Any

Many times there is no need for subsurface drainage. Make sure gutters and downspouts get water 10 feet away from the building. Get rid of shrubs and plants along the house and strongly consider a sidewalk along the house all the way around. Make sure that surface water moves away from the house and cannot pond at the house. Make sure the water has somewhere to go. Code requires 6" of fall in the first 10 feet away from the house, though it often does not happen. The dranage work should all be accomplished and tested before spending any extra money on sumps, pumps, and piping.
Let me know if more info is necessary.

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Here in Seattle we have a combined sewer system. Naturally it is now far too expensive for the city to retrofit storm sewers, so the situation persists. My house is old enough that the downspouts were connected to the combined sewer, but this is prohibited for new construction.
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No daylight in a french drain...
The same and other position is to put the source that is to be drained uphill if the property is on an incline. Just plain common sense.
--
Jonny



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