door frame first or flooring?

I'm building (and contracting some of the work) my own house. This is my second house and learned a bunch from the first. One thing that I'd really like to know is that after putting up drywall, ceiling, etc, what order do I do the door frame and flooring? Do I go ahead and put in the door frame, so that it's sitting on top of the concrete, and then tile goes in next (that's the way I did it the first time), or do we go ahead and get the tile down and put the door frame in afterwards so that the tiler doesn't have to try to tuck tile under the door frame?
Anyway, how is this typically done? If the door frame is done first, then does the tile installer just cut tile so that it fits snuggly against the bottom of the door frame, or for a more seemless look, does he rough cut and install it so that it's just beneath the door frame and is there just a bit of a gap between the concrete floor and the door frame?
I hope I've posed this question well enough to get an answer from people in the know.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most builders leave the floors for last. You should hang all doors and trim after dry wall. Then you should paint all trim and doors first then ceiling and walls. The floors go in last. You can rent a saw that is special made for cutting door casings to allow tyle to go under.. After floors are in, fenish with quarter-round shoe molding. Good Luck, Luke
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most builders leave the floors for last. You should hang all doors and trim after dry wall. Then you should paint all trim and doors first then ceiling and walls. The floors go in last. You can rent a saw that is special made for cutting door casings to allow tyle to go under.. After floors are in, fenish with quarter-round shoe molding. Good Luck, Luke
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think builders opt for floors last to minimize damage from the various trades moving through the house.
We built our own house a couple of years ago, and we installed our hardwood and tile floors before installing the door frames and cabinets. Much easier to install the flooring, no trimming of the doors needed, no fitting around cabinets, etc. Other than some trim work, the rest of the house was finished, so there was very little traffic on the new floors.
I think either order would work fine, but I thought installing the door frames last was much easier.
However, carpet was the very last thing we installed before moving in.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my house it went...
Concrete Door fames Tile Architrave Skirting
Its not practical to put the skirting on before tiling so you will have someone working in the room after tiling anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HockeyFan wrote:

To add to some of the other replies. With regards to tile there are some other reasons its best to go in last. Many people think droping your trim/doors on top of the tile will be easier for the finish carpenter, which in many cases it is, but this leaves small gaps at each grout joint under the base/case/jambs. These gaps are unsightly and nearly imposible to clean over time. Additionally doing it this way doesnt easily allow for compensation of humps/bumbs in the floor should there be any. If you are installing thin/short base its really not an issue to bend the base to meet the floor however many homes are moving towards tall base (4-5-6 inches) and hardwoods such as oak. These materials are nearly impossible to flex and even if you can get them there often times fasteners will not keep them there. The only option then is scribing all your base to the floor.
When you install your tile last, you are left with a clean, crisp, cleanable/wipable corner at the base. As the other reply said, it is most common to cut the jamb up to allow the tile to pass under it eliminating the need for a tricky cut at the door stops but thats it. Either a power jamb saw (rent) or an offset dovetail saw (buy) works fine.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.