DOOR CASING TRIM INSTALLATION QUESTION

I'm putting up new 2 1/2 inch wide door casing on a 36"x80 interior door
The door frame is not always even with the sheetrock all the way around..
In some places the sheetrock may stick out, about 1/16 to 1/8 inch beyond the frame ..which causes the casing to not sit flush with either the frame or the sheetrock itself..
How do you recommend to fix this..Do you score the sheetrock between the width of the casing and push it in towards the wall so the casing will lay flat ? or something else ?..
I don't have any specialized tools like a router or such..Just hand tools..
Thanks..
Rich
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A few delicate swats with a hammer on the high spots will usually suffice. Be careful to stay where the hammer tracks will cover up!! I'm teasing about delicate - mash the face of the rock to mush the guts - try NOT to tear the paper. I assume you really have door casing which is hollowed out on the back side to help deal with this exact issue.
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I try using a drywall rasp or like the guy said earlier mash it with a hammer. just try to stay within the area. after that if you hold your nails to just the jamb (which I recommend for tight miters and cleaner look) you can caulk between the wall and trim b4 painting. goodluck brother.
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Unless the frame is a extremely tight fit, should be that much of problem. The door casing should be shimmed within the door framing when the casing is plumb/straight/and level.
That said, using a T-square, or chalkline, mark the sheetrock 1/4" back. Cut the paper. Then, beat the exposed sheetrock on the edge with a hammer until it hits the paper again. Clean it up with sharp knife.
If you mean the sheetrock sticks out away from the wall, that's a different problem. Please clarify if so. Dave
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Big Brother wrote:

Glue a thin strip of wood to the frame and attach the casing through it. Shaving down the wallboard is not a good option.
R
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Whats wrong with that Rico..its only a 16th or an 8th here and there ? The 2 1/2 " casing should disguise that slight slope shouldn't it ? R
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Disagree, been there done that.. You'll always see the strip...and it'll look like crap. Mash the drywall, the trim will cover it up...
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Rich,

First, I'm assuming the door is installed plumb, and the wall is simply out of plumb? Or maybe the door frame is simply narrower than the wall thickness?
I had a couple of doors (out of about 11) that protruded beyond the wall surface. In my case, I used a router to rabbet the back edge of the trim so it fit flush against the door frame and the wall. I stopped the rabbets at each end so they don't show on the ends. You can't tell by looking at the trim that the door and wall don't line up.

If you're installing the door yourself, this is probably a good excuse to buy a new tool. That's usually the best time to justify the expense. You have a job to do, and there's a reason to buy the tool. It's usually not as easy to buy a tool, and then hope you have a project to use it for later. I've done that once or twice, and those tools tend to sit unused. The ones I bought when I needed them are the ones that get used most.
On the other hand, you could always rent a tool if you don't think you'll use it again.
In any case, another option would be to scribe the trim so it matches the contours of the wall exactly. You could then use a small block plane (or a belt sander, or maybe even a hand chisel) to shave away the unwanted wood. If done correctly, the trim would fit the door frame and wall exactly. Your comment "is not always even" makes me think the gap varies, in which case scribing is probably the only option that is going to be successful.
Anthony
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Big Brother wrote:

Thanks for all the responses..
I ended up simply mashing the drywall; by first scoring the area I wanted to mash with a utility knife, then being careful not to mash outside of the area that the moulding will cover..
The trim now sits even with both the wall and the door frame..
Appreciate all the help..
Rich
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