Dog Kennel Slab

A client wants a 12 and 22 dog kennel erected on a slab. The kennel panels sit flat and come in various lengths and have legs that stand off the pad about 2 inches...... Do I slope the entire slabe? Do I rise the middle? It would be nice to pour a level pad and be done....... Washing it off is the problem. The panels need to sit I assume flat so that they all hook together...... I have 3 - 7x6 panels... for each side.......21 ft. so 22 ft slab I have to 6x6 panels with a gate in one for the front......... I wonder what is best to do. jloomis thanks for any help.
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The panels have nothing to do with the drainage, so I don't know why you brought it into the picture.
How you intend to remove the waste is what determines the direction of the slope of the slab. Flat is out. High in the middle requires a moat around the slab. Low in the middle requires a drain of sorts. Angled slope to one side can either require a common drain on one side, or, a moat on one side leading to a drain. Dave
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Hi Dave, The panels are square and flat and fit together. Like playing cards. The kennel is outdoors in a large yard. If I slope the entire slab ( I may) then the panels will follow the tilt of the slab.......Like a shoe box on an out of level floor. Anyway, kennel owners say to slope 6"........ The door would be out of rack also....... There is no curb.... Thanks for your thoughts. john

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jloomis wrote:

You said the panels have legs--one would assume they're adjustable for precisely that reason -- to compensate for floor slope.
If not, your task, if you choose to accept it, is to make them such.
--
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Good Point! I believe you have the answer.......I can get sleeves for the legs that raise the portion I want. Hey, You are a help! John

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Does the kennel fencing supplier provide any guidance?
I'd slope it in the "direction of cleaning", can it be accessed and cleaned from the side?
Discuss the cleaning process & cycle with the client......how often it gets hosed out would determine whether you need to design / consider wash water handling.
Also local soil conditions should be considered.
Think about a vapor barrier under the slab (keeps the slab & dogs drier) & an epoxy paint for the upper surface.
cheers Bob
btw how did the redwood water tank situation work out?
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wrote:

The owner realizes his predicament. The trailer court is filled to the brim with residences The water is crucial...... I told him to install several smaller tanks near 3 or for units..... We will see. The kennel is another one.... I think I may slope the slab but then the door may be out of whack....? Maybe I slope it all toward the door? I don't know. Thanks John>

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alt.building.construction:

I've seen commercial implementations of what you want to do, and they always use sloped concrete to ease the disposal of unwanted matter. (Was that delicate enough?) You have two choices: you can slope to the inside or the outside of the slab.
If you slope to the inside, you'll have to have a trough that then slopes to one end of the slab. To clean the runs, you'll have to go to the back and spray toward the middle, or put up with nasty water splashing back in your face from the back wall.
If you slope to the outside, you'll have to have an opening to the outside in each pen with a moat outside (as mentioned in another posting). Alternatively, you can put the moat into the concrete inside the walls and slope them to the end of the slab. You can then clean the runs by spraying from the door toward the back wall.
No matter what you do, you'll need a sloped slab. If it were mine, I think I'd have a curb around the outside on which the walls could sit, then I'd have a cut through the curb for each run throuh which I could wash the debris. Then I'd go around outside and pick up what doesn't wash away.
In any case, think through what will be most convenient for the customer to use. My cost to put in a complicated slab will be far outweighed by the client's labor over the years.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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jloomis wrote:

conditions for their system.
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It amazes me that places like animal shelters even, don't know that concrete slabs are the worst things in the world to keep dogs on. Sure it's easy to clean but it cause dogs to have very early cases of hip displasia and arthritis.
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