detached garage insulation- vapor barrier needed?

I have a wood framed detached garage that I would like to insulate. I only plan on heating it a few times a year when I have a project to do or something I have to fix in winter (I live in upstate NY) with a portable heater. The garage is wrapped on the outside with Tyvek over the plywood and covered with vinyl siding. I plan on using r13 fiberglass insulation on the sides and r19 in the ceiling.
Is there any reason why I should use kraft faced in this situation? It is more expensive and I have a vapor barrier already with the Tyvek right? I will be covering the inside with 5/8 drywall on both walls and ceiling.
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I doubt if I would use a vapor barrier under those circumstances.
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Joseph Meehan

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In a previous post snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote...

Yes you should because the vapor barrier should always be installed on the warm side of the wall. The Tyvek is intended to keep rainwater from getting to the sheathing. It also has the advantage of letting out any moisture that may get through the interior vapor barrier.
The cost of kraft face insulation isn't that much more than unfaced insulation and for the average DIY'er it install much easier.
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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yea
tyvek keeps water out and lets vapor through from what i understand
but you dont want bare insulation in a garage where you are doing projects
just think of how nasty its gonna get with sawdust or body filler dust getting in the fiberglass
There is something called Tileboard its like pegboard material cant think of it right now but it comes in many styles and is supose to be used in bathrooms although i would never use it there.
its not real cheap but it would make your garage much more liveable and not cost so much
OR
lots of times you can goto a home depot or Lowes and they will have drywall that has been dammaged on the edges by some fool that cant drive a forklift you could pick that up for $2-3 a sheet and mud the heck out of it
its kinda hit or miss that there will be any there when you need it so you might endup doing half a wall every couple months until you get it done.
bob marencin www.yourepair.com
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On 10 Aug 2006 07:27:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

imho,
The vapor barrior is intended on keeping warm most air from entering the insulation, and then condensing as it migrates to cooler spots of the insulation. Since you don't want trapped moisture in your insulation, could create mold conditions, reduce insulation properties, expose wood studs to to rotting; you want to use a moisture barrior on the inside face of the insulation.
later,
tom @ www.WorkAtHomePlans.com
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Tom The Great wrote:

Tom is right and it is a CODE requirement in most areas to use vapor barrier. If cost is a problem you can use regular batting and plastic over that as a vapor barrier if it is approved in your area.
Terry North Combination Building Inspector
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On 11 Aug 2006 16:26:14 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Using unfaced stuff, and then one continuous vapor barrier, such as poly, seems like a great idea. fewer penitrations for moisture migration, and might cut down on any future drafts.
later,
tom
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I am in Ontario, across the lake from NY, and my garage gets very damp in winter with water dripping off cars, caused me to think that it is best to line it with a poly vapour barrier. It is cheap insurance against rot and mould, do it to avoid future problems.

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OK I am convinced that a vapor barrier is needed. Would Kraft faced be sufficient or should I also use poly?
EXT wrote:

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