countertop suggestions

Page 1 of 2  
i'm somewhere between 8-16 months from redoing the entire kitchen. i don't necessarily need to "break the bank" and go high end on everything, but i don't want formica countertops. the time frame on doing the kitchen over isn't a pressing situation where it has to be done ASAP but we've been in the house 14yrs and it's still origional, early '60's but w/ new appliances 6 yrs ago. i'm looking for the best bang for my $$ on countertops and i like the smooth look and feel of Corian and similar tops but looking for the best of both worlds....good price, long life and durability to usage. is waiting on newer products advisable??? or are the products ouit there now the best to offer??
thanks for any tips and advice,
mike.........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wilsonart do a product called SSV (in Ireland) - it is a 3mm solid surface (Corian type) product and it can be bonded onto mdf, particleboard or other stable substrates. It gives you the look and feel of Corian but at a much reduced price. Very good range of colours - have used it myself and it is exactly like the real thing - you use built up edges to give the look of inch and 1/2 material. Check it out on their web page to see what you think.
Good Luck
JerseyMike wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Shop around and go granite. Do it once, do it right. Corian is too soft, and knives cut it easily no matter what naysayers say.
Go the extra and get granite. You'll be glad you did.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Except my wife hates seams in the countertop.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you certain yet you'll have seams though? Before assuming, rough sketch up your kitchen and fax it in to a granite fabricator asking if it'll be possible for that layout to be done from a single piece of granite without any seam joints.
FWIW, my granite countertops have 0 seams. They were 43 square feet total. Longest piece of my counter was 105" (25" deep through most of it, but a J shape at the end/corner that goes out to 36"). The other pieces were a 47x26" island, a 13x25 and a 40x25 in there, and the 4" backledge all around all from one hunk of granite with no seams.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://toddh.net /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What, there's seamless Formica now?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Corian and its clones are seamless.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Granite has its own downsides. It needs to be sealed so it doesn't stain, and it can crack with sudden heat.
The synthetic quarz-based stuff doesn't need to be sealed, but whether that's much of a factor depends on the person in question.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL--I love how folks bring this up (important though it is), but it's listed as a downside, as though it's so hard to spray sealer down and run a rag over it once every few months.
The reality is that it's as easy as dusting a wood table, and takes about 45 seconds for the whole kitchen.
GRanite, pardon the pun rocks. Can't imagine having a synthetic material in my kitchen instead, especially when really nice looking granite can be had for 55/sf installed with haul away, edges, sink cutout, etc included.
Best regards, -- Todd H. http://toddh.net /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Your right Most people that bring up the issue of sealing Granite have there heads up there ass so far, they don't even know anything about it, spout off second hand information. Well hears the facts clean the counter tops off do a really good job the same principal to clean any counter material , Now the hard part put the sealer on a rag spread around let it dry ( doesn't take long) Now how often about every seven months to a year, If you seal it to often it can dull the finish. I've had Granite in my house for three years not one stain not one problem beyond a doubt the best counter top I've ever had. Most people that find the faults in Granite are basically to cheap to buy it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think it's actually worse than that.
Granite is cheaper now (if you deal directly with a fabricator and not a reseller, or oy...through the big boxes) than the synthetics because the cost of freakin oil is so high, and of course the marketing and corporate markup involved in having a material that has a brand associated with it (and marketing folks inventing problems with competing natural material to justify the extra cost).
$55/sf is what I paid, total, installed, old stuff removed for mine. Even included a good quality, deep undermount stainless sink.
Corian and Silestone both are a good 40% more than that most places. I just don't get the appeal of these, other than the granite being too hard and capable of breaking dishes easier than synthetic surfaces.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://toddh.net /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only downside to granite is that it's TOO hard. I've broken glasses , dishes etc by just tapping them. The sealing is a non-issue- Just spray and wipe!!!. Corian etc are nice in that specific colors can be had where granite is close.
Todd H. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK...question how does it stand up to things such as heat or cracking or chipping?? say a pot or dish or glass or coffee mug was dropped from either cabinet height or something like that? is it repairable?? excuse the questions please, but i'd rather hear fom people who have this ytpe of knowledge rather that a salesman or business owner pushing something for the $$$.
mike......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heat from cookware shouldn't be a problem. Glass or coffee mug dropping on it shouldn't be a problem either. Dropping a heavy cast iron skillet would be a different story. You may chip it or even crack it. Surface scratches you could polish out with diamond pads - messy as the pads require water. Chips you could color match and fill - I've tried it but very hard to make it match both in color and texture. If the granite has patterns of color movement it would take some skill and the repair won't be as strong as the granite. Cracks you could fill and polish. Don't think the results will be satisfactory unless you found someone with some high level skill. Acid from juices will also attack the granite surface - use a sealer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
# Fred # wrote:

I have been putting in ceramic tile counter tops in my rentals for years. Never have had any problems. I have them in my house and will never have anything else. You will have grout lines, things break if dropped on them but they are beautiful, easy to do and cheap.
I'm did a cemet top at my friends house last month, also easy, we stained the mud prior to pour then randomly scattered a differnt color on top before polishing. No seams, peice of cake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Raider Bill wrote:

when dishes laid down on it. You can't use the counter to roll dough out on. There are just way tooo many reasons I'd never have tile.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 13:02:25 -0500, Goomba38 wrote:

Tile counter tops do look dated, but now that "everybody" has granite, it won't be long before it (and stainless appliances for that matter) looks dated, too, because.....once upper management finds that the cubicle dwellers have them, they will have to find something new and more exclusive for their kitchens....and everybody's quest for the newest and most fashionable will start over again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

'fraid you're too right. What's the carbon-footprint of fashion?
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hear hear. Unless you're fixing to sell (in which case why invest in granite), that something looks "dated" is a dumb reason not to do something, if you really like it otherwise. All this stainless-appliance/cherry cabinetry/dark granite/wood floor/stainless hardware look in the kitchen is just gonna scream 2000-ought decade in just a few years. And it's gonna be "dated".
I went for granite for several reasons (I just plain love stone, the primary reason), but tile is fairly practical if the grout is chosen right and is sealed, and gives certain looks, like country or Spanish/Mexican that others don't. Disadvantages like chipping, advantages like price and DIY friendly. Don't pick a light grout. I picked chocolate brown grout in my terra-cotta colored procelein kitchen floor tile and my beige bathroom floor has dark grey grout. Seal it, wipe up spills right away for good measure, enjoy it, take a vacation with what the granite would have cost if you're not really into the granite.
If you like it, do it, but do what you can afford. Houses are for the living.
Banty
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20 Jan 2007 14:07:57 -0800, Banty wrote:

years, if not forever.
But that won't be good enough for some people. I can just picture a woman on one of those home improvement shows looking at a kitchen in the year 2015: "Granite, how creepy. If I want to look at granite, I'll go to the cemetery." And: "Stainless steel. How tacky. I don't go into those places, but people tell me that McDonald's uses it in their kitchens."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.