Construction Company interested in going nationwide

Construction company interested in doing sub-contract work nationwide for corporations. Where can I find this kind of buisness opportunity. If by grapevine, Do I submit query letters? Just wanted some advice on how to get on board with these kinds of Corporations that are doing new construction and face lifts on thier stores throughout the country...
any advice??? let me know, I'm very interested.
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Might want to talk to big stores like Walmart. Here is a link to Walmart realty...
http://wal-martrealty.com/Buildings/MainPages/MainBldgPage.html#BuildingContacts
"Daiseyduke721" wrote in message

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Daiseyduke--
I don't want to be an alarmist, but--be careful! I write a lot of articles in construction magazines, mostly focusing on getting paid for your work. I was part of a panel at this year's World of Concrete, where we discussed that same topic. There were some horror stories told by a few people, talking about what it was like to work for the "Big Box" stores. And it wasn't pretty! That article is available at: www.SitePrepMag.com. Look for the article titled "Full Contact Project Management". It was written by me--so of course I think it's great! It's the current issue (Summer 2006), so go get it now.
I also write in Masonry and in Coatings Pro, and this Fall I will also be in Construction Purchasing, and a lot of my stuff deals with changes in the plans and specs. This is where you'll absolutely get hammered if you don't know what you're doing.
Some suggestions for you: read those magazines, because they are available online and my columns will help you. Better yet, go to my website, below, and order my book. It is called "Get Paid for a Change!", and is subtitled, "The Contractor's Blueprint for Turning Extra Work into Extra Money--through Change Orders".
I'll just put it to you this way: if you don't know how to deal with the changes in your scope of work, you will get your clock cleaned and get your a.. handed to you! Sorry to be so blunt, but it's true.
The basic theme of my book is that too many contractors do too much extra work for free. Unless you have some kind of a system for dealing with changes, such as my book, or a very wise partner who knows all of this stuff, you'll lose.
Let me know if I can help you further. Sorry to be a wet blanket on your plans!
Coach Gary snipped-for-privacy@fullcontactPM.com www.fullcontactPM.com
"You Need this Stuff!"
Daiseyduke721 wrote:

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This sounds *very* familiar to me. I've not had experience with large corporations in the construction business, but have in other lines of work. And the above is quite true when it comes to large corporations. Many will "squeeze" small vendors doing business with them. They want work done at a discount. They will want extra work done for no additional payment. And then sometimes they will just announce that they are not going to pay for a certain job. And you have 50 jobs and a lot of future work with this company, so if you tell them to stick it, then you risk losing all that business.
Basically large corporations have "bean counters" who sit around thinking of any and everyway they can squeeze a few more pennies profit out of this or that. Doing what is morally right or doing the right thing does not enter into their thinking. They cheat in this game and do it because they can.
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Bill--
If you are working in the building industry, you really should read the article in Site Prep. When you do, I'd be interested in your take on it.
And, while I don't say this in the article, I much prefer to do public works projects, because you don't have to take crap there--if you're the low bidder, you'll get the job! Doesn't matter whether you are liked, or not!
Gary
Bill wrote:

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Very good article and advice.
I think a lot of people are used to all the "consumer protection" with home and personal contracts. They don't realize that in business, all is fair and cheating is allowed. With a few clever words in a contract, you can be toast. So the contracts need to be read and understood.
There is no "consumer protection" when it is a "business to business" contract!
When referring to a year or years for example, the wording "the years in which" is a whole lot different from the wording "the years for which".
[The years in which the company did business.] (Company did business for 1 year in 2005 and for 1 day of 2004. The above equals two years.)
[The years for which the company did business.] (Does this mean one year of doing business?)
Then...
You will be paid a bonus of $50,000.00 for each year in which your company is employed as a contractor.
You will be paid a bonus of $50,000.00 for each year for which your company is employed as a contractor.

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