ceramic tile underlay over advantech

Can anyone tell me the proper adhesive to secure ceramic tile underlayment (hardiboard or duroc) to advantech subfloor? I know this is done all the time so I assume there is a typical method. Thinset mortar is not recommended for particle board which advantech is. Someone told me liquid nails is what I should use....? Thanks in advance, K
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Liquid Nails and screws.
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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Anyone else??
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Liquid nails and screws is what I've seen done. Thinset is for the tile not the backer board.
--
Art

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Not quite true. The prime enemy of tile is substrate movement. Thinset supports the entire backer board, not just a few spots like construction adhesive. If your subfloor is dead flat and you've dealt with lippage between adjoining sheets by sanding or using a feathering compound, the thinset is probably not necessary. I still use it every time as it's foolproof and takes care of a lot of issues in one step. Bonding layers together provides a far stiffer assembly than screws and a bit of glue.
This from USG's web site:
Floors Lamination Laminate 12.7 mm (1/2) DUROCK Panel to minimum 16 mm (5/8) thick exterior grade plywood using adhesive or mortar suitable for bonding cement backer board to plywood.Apply adhesive with 16 mm (5/8) V-notched trowel or mortar with 6 mm (1/4) square-notched trowel. Laminate and secure one panel at a time.Cover the adhesive with the board immediately.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

--
Art


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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

First of all, I would seal the particle board with a product like RedGard or equivalent.
http://tinyurl.com/2h5leb
That will help to protect it from the inevitable moisture damage. That done, I would not use liquid nails, but a product like PL400, which is self shimming.
http://www.doityourself.com/invt/4165965
What that means is that if there are variations in floor heighth (an uneven floor), the PL400 will fill AND SUPPORT the gaps between the particle board and the hardibacker. This reduces flex which is the enemy of tile installations.
In addition, I would use screws to mechanically fasten the hardibacker. The PL400 will help to bridge depressions and bond the substrates together and the screws will pull the two surfaces together tightly. The entire system serves to eliminate flex.
Finally another application of Red Guard over the seams to eliminate as much water intrusion onto the particle board as possible.
The best possible application would be to replace the particle board with plywood, but you did not ask that question. Also, make sure that you have at least 1-1/4" of support under the tile.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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On Aug 11, 1:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Advantech is billed as being water resistant, though not for long term exposure. I seriously doubt you'd have a problem with directly attaching the backer board with thinset or mastic. If you're concerned, you could seal the Advantech before using the thinset, and/ or you could use an alternative system such as Schluter's Ditra. http://www.johnbridge.com/ceramic_tile_floors_ditra.htm It's a bit more expensive, but it's waterproof, serves as an uncoupling membrane (no cracks) and it's easy to install.
Check out the John Bridge tile forums - excellent tiling resource. http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/index.php
R
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