Butt Siding to Corner Trim, or cover siding with corner trim?

I will be installing the siding on my in-laws remodel in coming weeks, but I'm wondering about the installation of the Corner trim.
Currently, their cedar siding runs to the corners of the building, then 1x6 corner trim boards are applied on top of the siding to cover the corners. While this approach is easy enough, it leaves gaps at each dip in the siding pattern for water, dirt, bugs, etc. to get in. Of course, the house has been that way for 100 years and seems to do fine.
On the other hand, I was thinking of installing the corner boards on the sheathing first, then butting the siding boards into the corner boards, caulking the joints.
I'll be redoing all four corners of the house, so it doesn't necessarily have to match the old work. Is there a "preferred" way of installing corner trim?
Thanks,
Anthony
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I like corners..... Yes they can harbor voids and bug places for hiding.
On a quick and dirty install we but the corner with siding and then trim. On a better install I like to wrap the house with 30# felt, and put a sheet metal corner on each corner - about an 8 ' or however high one is going by at least 3" bend on each side...Then, tite siding to corner and trim..... You can "Blind Stop" that is a very nice attachment on each corner with like a 2" wide board by the thickness of the siding.....this can be put over the metal corner also.....best install......Then the siding butts to that.....caulk with "Big Stretch" or equal siding to blind stop, then counter trim with a larger board.... john

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HerHusband | 2009-07-19 | 10:21:44 AM wrote:

This is the way I prefer to do it. Cutting the siding to length isn't so critical since it'll be covered.

I did a job with this method yesterday, but only because the client was overly concerned about avoiding any cracks where bugs could get into the house. The downside was that there was only one stud to nail the siding to next to windows. It's not a show-stopper, but I avoid it if I can.

Our Habitat for Humanity procedures used to specify trim on top of siding, but they changed it a couple of years ago. The triangular gaps required a ton and a half of caulk, and it's hard to find volunteers who are neat enough with a caulk gun.
Funny story: I trained the volunteers how to put up HardiPlank siding, specifying that there be no more than 1/8" gap between the siding and the corner board. I helped them put up the first course, then left them to it. When I checked back, everything looked good, and they were the fastest siders I ever had.
My mistake was that I only checked the right end of the siding. On the left end, they were leaving a gap big enough to put my thumb through. They said, "We though you said *at least* a 1/8" gap". Then they wanted to use a circular saw to trim the ends so they could butt filler pieces in. I had to make them take all the siding off and do it over again. Habitat motto: We do it right the _last_ time.
Lesson learned: Check both ends. Then check the bottom, top, front, back, and inside. Remember, they're volunteers.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Steve,

I thought it looked like a crackpot idea when I first saw it, but now it sounds like it's fairly common. :)


Well, I guess I'll have to think about both options and decide which I want to use. I think I still lean towards butting the siding into the corner boards, but putting the corner boards on top would match some of the existing window trim. Then again, half of the windows will be new with new trim, so it's a toss-up either way.
Thanks for the advice.
Anthony
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Normally, when installing Hardiplank horizontally run siding, the corners are put on first and the siding butts just short of the corners as Steve stated. The corners are usually made by James Hardie as well in an equivalent 1X4 dimension. This is all "cement/resin board", not cedar siding and trim. It does bear a lesson if you're installing the corner boards first. Give it a slight gap between the siding and corner boards to allow for expansion and caulk.
--
Dave



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