Build your own house the slick way - yourself!

http://socketsystems.com /
With this system I could easily build that gambriel barn home in no time. The video they show, shows one guy raising a barn HIMSELF!
You build the frames on the ground, then using a hinged baseplate, lift into place and set. What could be easier?
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That looks pretty slick. I am sure the fellow spent lots of time doing the project especially devising ways to lift and bolt and place things. You know plywood gussets do just the same in the Oregon Barn system. Also Simpson Strong Tie makes hardware similar to the socket system. It really depends on how you want to build. I like to pour the concrete floor at the first part of the job too. That way, you have a nice level staging area to roll around and lift. Scaffold works well too in these situations. A person can get a few sets of staging, that is not that expensive to have to do most of the work on and be safe at the same time. We also use a "Genie Lift" that can lift beams in short order. I rent that tool from the rental when needed, and put all the beams up the same day.
I looked up a quick search for Oregon Barn Plans. Here is a sample: http://www.ashlandbarns.com/beaverton.html
Good luck. john

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richard wrote:

With that system, how exactly do you know what loads such a structure is capable of resisting?
Rui Maciel
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The winch and tractor helped a bit. There's always a way for one person to build something on a residential scale. It's just a question of whether or not it makes sense. What makes sense is often determined by whether you're the one person or someone else looking at it from an unbiased perspective. I have been on both sides.

Having a helper to start. The amount of time and effort wasted in building something like that by yourself is simply phenomenal, not to mention more dangerous.
R
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Maybe it's just me, but I don't see any advantage of this system compared to traditional stick framing. My wife and I built our own house and didn't need a tractor or winch system to accomplish it. We did so without expensive steel framing systems like this, using traditional construction techniques that are well known and easily approved by building inspectors. It's easy to calculate spans, roof loads, etc.
For the most part, I did most of our construction working alone. With a little planning and a few jigs there were few tasks I could not complete by myself. Of course, having a helping hand can make many tasks easier. For example, I would build our walls in eight foot sections, fully sheathed. Then my wife would help me tilt them up and brace them in the evening. I'm sure I could have worked out some system to do that alone too if needed, but it was more enjoyable working together with my wife.
As for roof trusses, most manufacturers will deliver them right to the top of your walls, ready to install. We did not have that luxury since the truck could not get down our driveway. Still, my wife and I had no difficulty carrying the trusses 150' down to the house, lifting them up on the walls, and tilting them in place.
I stick framed most of the roof in our house and worked out methods to install 24' long 2x12' rafters by myself. With proper planning, tasks like this are not as difficult as they appear initially.
That socket system may offer other advantages, but for working alone it seems like an unnecessary added expense.
Anthony
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 15:30:20 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband wrote:

One idea I have to raise the beams is to erect two poles at midpoints between each half. Then perhaps a crossmember on which I would attach a winch. The winch then pulls the beams into place.
I suppose even some scaffolding could do the job just the same. Then move the scaffolding to the next beam as needed.
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You seem to be on a quest to reinvent the wheel. This can be fun, but it is cheating to get input. If by some odd chance you are actually planning on doing some work, instead of building castles in the air, why not do some homework? It's all been done before. Believe it or not there have been times in human history where there was a need to build/move something and only one guy to do it, or extremely limited manpower.
Go play around with Google Books and search for rigging, barn raising, gin poles, that sort of thing.
I expect to see some pictures in your next post showing how far you've progressed with the actual construction.
R
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 15:30:20 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

I did not look, but that web site offer to do your calc's for you. Most cities/townships want to see plans.
Most times a cooler full of beer/soda will get you some friends to help out.
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