board and bat siding?

wanting to apply rough timber board and bat siding to a new construction, but my "thinking like water" mentality makes me a bit nervous about the vertical joints and the dimensional variations of the rough timber. how can vertical siding be installed to best shed water? is it ok if the boards vary a bit in thickness?
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Avasa wrote:

First of all, it is board and batten. The best way to install it to prevent water intrusion is to install it over felt or housewrap, then install your boards tightly together, then your battens over the gaps. If your battens are at least 2-3" wide, you won't have much worry about shedding rain.
For further protection, you could run a bead of caulk on either side of the gaps in your boards, then install the batten on top of the caulk.
The boards should be the same thickness, or you will need to shim one side or the other to keep your battens flat on both boards.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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30 # felt is best with board and batten. I have used Breckenridge rough sawn plywood and batts. Not only does this follow code for shear strength in our area, it also iw a water tight way to seal the building. It looks similiar to board and batt. If a person wanted the old look then using board and batt wiil work, and like the other reply trying to fir the board or kerf the batt to make a tighter fit is best. Nailing the batt has been an age old question. some prefer 1 nail........so that the board can move. staggered......Others just nail 2 nails in the board and 2 in the batt. The reason for this concern is that if the board is large like a 1x12 it tends to split........ With one nail in the board it has give.......Same with batt..... Your guess is as good as mine. jloomis

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I have a small barn, about 16 by 12 that is board and batten. The boards are random width rough sawn, between 8 inches and 12 inches wide. The battens are 2 inches wide and nailed to the boards (there are not studs behind every batten). There are cats between studs at the four foot mark. This barn is the driest one I have, never any water getting in regardless of the weather. This is partly because the rough sawn lumber swells a bit with humidity and seals tighter. The same thing happens with the cedar shake roof. You can se daylight through some of the pinholes through it, but when it rains, it seals up tight.
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This is true.... Maybe we should build "barn style" anyway...... I have worked on houses and that were wood shingled and you could see daylight in the attic and dry as a bone. All "thatch roofs" are the same...... Worlds renewable resource.....thatch..... Oh and some of these thatch styles have dirt floors....... That is where the word "Threshold" comes from.....I believe they threw thresh on the floor and in the front of the house became known as threshold...... 4 poster beds with cloth on top? To keep the debris off the bedding from "thatch roofs" Love those barns.... jloomis

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