Best way to flash this roof to wall intersection?

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Just a brief followup...

I worked on my in-laws place again yesterday, and after stripping away some of the trim boards, I discovered the carport wasn't as racked as I initially thought. Maybe 1" out of plumb instead of the 3-4" I originally measured. That's straighter than the house itself, good news there.
So, I started connecting the carport with the house structure, and by the time I got the sheathing built out for an even plane up the entire wall, I was happy to discover the flashing fit tightly against the sheathing as-is. It's a bit angled near the bottom, but not enough to be an issue.
http://www.mountain-software.com/clark/flashing.jpg
So, the siding will lap the flashing just fine. I decided to just order the Dryflekt kickout diverter flashing so that should take care of the water running down the wall at the intersection. I still need to replace the fascia board near the house, but otherwise it's all good to go. The windows are supposed to arrive this week, so I should be able to get those in next weekend.
New problem (more accurately, an old problem), the carport is built on a simple concrete slab. This put the siding/sheathing way too close to the ground, 2" at most, almost touching in other areas. As you would expect, the siding near the ground has serious rot issues.
http://www.mountain-software.com/clark/ground.jpg
Obviously, building a new foundation is out of the question right now, as is adding a row of block or bricks at the bottom of the wall. So, I'm looking for more of a "quick fix" make-do solution. I wish I could do the job properly, but it's just not within the constraints of time or budget right now.
So, I'm thinking of ripping off the bottom 6-8" of the rotted siding, and attaching a strip of something a bit more waterproof. I initially thought of using something like cement based Hardie siding, but I don't know if it would hold up in a near ground contact situation like that?
Another option might be composite decking like Trex, but again, I don't know if it would hold up in ground contact? Also, it's a lot thicker than I need (1-1/2 vs. 1/2") so I would have to rip it into thinner strips. But for that to look nice I would need to run them through my planer afterwards, and I have no idea if composite decking material can be planed successfully? I've only seen Trex in 2x6 sizes, so it's a little shorter (5-1/2") than I had hoped, but it's better than nothing if the thickness and rot resistance worked out.
The other option I thought of is that PVC trim board material. Unfortunately, I can't say I've ever seen it available locally, and I believe it's only available in white?
I haven't used any of these products myself, so I have no experience with them. Are there any other options I may have overlooked?
Thanks,
Anthony
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On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 15:39:45 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Maybe relandscaping (remove some of the ground, improve drainage, etc.) would resolve some if not most problems.

Uh, no, not Trex. It's plastic, won't rip into thinner forms easily (maybe with a band saw) and AFAIK it is not stable enough if made too thin.

Would you run a plastic milk bottle through your planer? Thats 'basically' what Trex is, the same type of plastic, and other materials.

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Unfortunately, that's not an option. As it is, the house and carport kind of sit in a depression compared to the surrounding houses and the yard is already sloped away from the buildings as much as possible.

I have a band saw, and whatever I use will be backed with a heavy wood that sits on the carport slab. So it doesn't have to be overly sturdy.

That's kind of what I figured but since I've never worked with it I thought maybe I didn't understand it fully. Thanks for confirming.
Thanks,
Anthony
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Trex is wood and plastic composite, I believe. At any rate, it works just fine with ordinary woodworking tools. I ripped deck boards down the middle on my bandsaw to make trim boards for my porch. I have routed the ends of boards with round-over bits. I kept all my scraps and have made a number of brackets, etc out of Trex, it is a great material for working with.
It is available in 3/4" trim boards anyway, although they are much more expensive than the deck boards.
--
Dennis


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I believe that paintable versions are available. And my understanding is that of the various solutions you proposed, this is really the only one that is satisfactory in the long term.
Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne,

Well, I might have to make a few calls and see if I can find it locally. I'm sure it's probably expensive, but I wouldn't need much.
Thanks,
Anthony
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2009 00:15:49 GMT, Wayne Whitney

Painting PVC can be 'fun'. Look for a paint that uses Acetone for a thinner, and you'll have a paint that is *more* likely to stick. I spray a (light) coat of straight acetone about 10 minutes before spraying the PVC trim, a second about 2 minutes before, then immediately hit it with the top coat. The two straight acetone sprays soften the PVC surface (don't use too much) and allow the paint to grab. Done right, the paint is almost impossible to get off. (Done wrong, it will peel off in under a year!)
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