Beam size

I would like to open up a basement by removing a 2x6 stud wall and replace it with a wood laminated beam ( 2x10's or 12's) where can I get some info on the proper size and min opening between supports. It's a 2 story house and 12' joist span at existing wall.
Thanks Dave
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Try the Canadian Wood Council's online design tools or an engineered lumber manufacturer's web site, such as Trusjoist. Both have span tables for their products.
R
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It would be a bit unusual for a basement wall to be load bearing. I suspect you have a beam/girder already and the 2x6 wall was used to conceal the i beam and /or columns. You can't just yank the wall out and hope that the beam is there, but I would sure do some extra research.
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Dave wrote:

Your local lumber yard would help. T.
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on 4/4/2008 11:30 AM Dave said the following:

Above my head right now, I have a triple 2x10 beam that spans 11 feet across an alcove and supported at the ends by being embedded into concrete walls. The joists run perpendicular across this beam. There is a kitchen above and it has been there for 25 years.
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You really should seek information on the _maximum_ distance between supports. The minimum is always 0'-0" ;)
R
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If you Google
wood beam span tables
you will get all the info you need, and more.
James
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James wrote:

Maybe, maybe not. The span tables don't give you the load calculations nor factor in all of the adjustment factors that apply to wood structural members.
Matt
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Dave-
If you can calculate the load that the beam will need to handle (lbs per ft). you could use a span calculator to size it.
Depending on the load & the span you might be able to get away with a multiple 2x10 or 2x12.
If the loads are high & you want to minimize beam depth you might consider a glulam.
here is a link to glulam load / span tables depending on service condition & wood species
http://www.aitc-glulam.org/capacity.asp
cheers Bob
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Bobk207 wrote:

And the key statement here is "Specific beam designs should be reviewed by a licensed design professional."
Matt
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Dave-
As Matt points out, unless you can correctly determine the load & pick a serviceable beam, you might want to consider using a designer, engineer or experienced contractor.
cheers Bob
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