Basement Subfloor using recycled foam product


I am looking for user experience with a sub floor material made from recycled foam. I found it available from the following two sources: in Canada at: http://www.3rfoam.com/allinone_hf/index.html
In USA at: http://www.3rdfoam.com/product.html
I'm not sure if they are connected or simply one company is a copy-cat of the other. Anyhow, it seems like a good product and the sample piece I have seems OK. But I can not find any recommended methods for use as a basement sub floor. I.e. should I apply plywood over top? How thick? Can I install laminate without the plywood? Should I include a separate vapor barrier under or over top?
My house was built in '67 and the basement floor currently has a glued carpet over top (which is getting ripped out).
Anyone with experience or recommendations would be appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 2 Nov 2009 19:51:58 -0800 (PST), "Mr. Robinson"

IMHO, unless I misunderstand what they are selling, it is not appropriate for a floor. You don't mention what you are putting on the floor (carpet, hardwood, softwood, or one of the laminates) but that will also make a difference.
What I do with basement floors is to lay a grid of 2x4 (flat side down, so height is 2" (1.5 really). Then fill in the grid with rigid building foam insulation. If the floor is wet, then all bets are off of corse, and as well, I usually put in a couple of 'monitoring' holes (in closets, or other out of the way areas) to allow checking for moisture on the slab as time goes on.
On top of the gridwork, I lay sub-flooring and usually carpet. A *really dry* basement could be done with hardwood or other material, but most are not dry enough. I'd be happy to try to get a picture of a neighbor's basement floor which looks dry, but when they laied laminate on it, the laminate failed in about 4 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have done this method in garage floors to convert to family rooms... I put down first a good water based concrete seal......... Then I use a roll of weather guard roofing material....overlap. On that if there is enough room , I put in sleepers 2x4 p.t.lumber....flat or upright......then fill with hard foam insulation.....I do leave an air space if possible for ventilation between subfloor ply and insulation.....If no space.....I just do a tight fit.... never have had a problem with moisture or mold..... john
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sounds almost exactly like what I do, except I use 8 mil plastic (never thought about using weather guard roofing material, and will give that some serious thought the next time around!) I have always done the sleepers flat because there never seems to be enough head room in basements! I guess a garage conversion may have better headroom, however.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi In this one case there was room to put the sleepers upright. I like the weatherguard since it is tough, and one side has silica on it and the other sticks to anything....the overlap works well. I like the vent idea.....and put some "bird holes" inbetween the weatherguard and ply.....keeps things airy.... never any troubles with this........and it is in a moist enviornment john
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What did tech support at the company say when you called them? If they couldn't answer your question, they weren't very helpful and you shouldn't buy from their products.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am guessing that he probably wants opinions of those who don't have a stake in selling the product. Unless, of course, he works for the company himself...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.