attaching xps to interior concrete wall, how?

Is this attached with some special glue? and how tight does it have to be to the wall. My wall is a block wall, do i have to put caulk or something into all the joints of the block? Do the overlap joints on the xps need a caulk too? My one basement wall is 90% above grade, and it is cold down here in the basement 8-p. 15 C today and it is 8C outside
Should I use 1" or 2" xps on walls? I will be using 1 " on floor. Location is southern ontario. thanks
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Rusty wrote:

What the hell is xps?
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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A model of Dell computer. I believe he's referring to EPS - extruded polystyrene.
R
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No XPS, expanded polystyrene.
wrote:

A model of Dell computer. I believe he's referring to EPS - extruded polystyrene.
R
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I mean extruded polystyrene, eps is expanded polystyrene
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EPS and XPS are made from the same plastic (polystyrene), but the process is different. EPS begins as small plastic "beads" that are expanded and fused
together. It is the same as the white foam in many disposable coffee cups. XPS
begins as a continuous mass of molten material. It is familiar as the yellow foam
used in trays for fresh cuts of meat at the supermarket.
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yes, I concur that xps refers to extruded polystyrene (dow blue is a common brand). architects in these parts use that abbreviation.
as for attaching it, it partly depends on what is going over it. you do need to cover it because it will burn and release toxic gas if exposed to flame. I'd recommend using as much foam as you can stand and can afford. if you really want to do it right, use two layers and stagger the joints. xps gives you about R 5 per inch. I don't think glue is necessary.
you can get 2" metal z strips that hold the foam in place and are shot onto the walls with powder actuated fasteners or short tapcons. I have also used wood firring strips as wide as the foam is thick, and fit the foam between the wood strips. i do this as i go --apply strip, then foam, then another strip, etc so you can get a good fit witht he foam. attach the wood strips with tapcons. you could even place the foam on the wall and hold it in place with a 1x2 over the foam, though it would take a very long tapcon. there is no one right way. if you are putting up drywall, the metal z strips will work, but if you are using wood panelling, you will want some wood back there to nail to.
i tape the seams with tyveck tape. caulk would do the same thing, but the tape is easier and cleaner.
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Im going to frame with 2x3, so I could just use the framing to hold it in place? And if there is air gap somewhere behind xps and moisture gets behind, it will not mould?( shouldnt happen , as I have had not one drop of moisture in 3 years since moving in) thanks

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Rusty wrote:

if you are worrying about moisture and mold, you definitely want to keep anything that can feed the mold out of there (like wood or fiberglass insulation). An airspace would also be a good thing. if you have the foam tight against the block, that seems like more of a mold environment.

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