Appropriate screws for the *sides* of plywood (?)


I was wondering this.
It's never ideal of course, but sooner or later for small projects I end up needing to end-screw (side screw?) into a plywood sheet. Is there a "teethier" than normal woodscrew for the job?
A woodworker for small projects that I saw was using drywall screws which just don't ever work well in any wood IME, but beats me about plywood.
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"Thomas G. Marshall" wrote:

Try coarse thread, self tapping sheet metal screws.
I use stainless steel for my projects.
YMMV
Lew
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I was wondering this, but couldn't come up with the reason I thought so. Why would that work? Thread gaps alone?
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"Thomas G. Marshall" wrote:

I was wondering this, but couldn't come up with the reason I thought so. Why would that work? Thread gaps alone? ---------------------------------------- Using a 75% pilot hole, the coarse thread cuts thru the wood fibers rather than crushing them.
The coarse thread also leaves a larger wood cross section to carry the shear load.
Lew
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Particle board screws, aka low-root, work well if you drill a pilot hole. A drill bit slightly larger than the root of the screw works best. If you drill too small a pilot hole, the threads will try to push the plies apart, weakening their hold.
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Interesting idea. Given how much adhesive (epoxy?) is used in the making of these things I'm tempted to tap out something coarse and use a machine screw. :)
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On 03/02/2010 12:16 AM, Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Machine screws actually work really well in tapped holes in tight grained hardwoods like maple.
Chris
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"Thomas G. Marshall" wrote:
Interesting idea. Given how much adhesive (epoxy?) is used in the making of these things I'm tempted to tap out something coarse and use a machine screw. :) ------------------------------------- If you truly want to solve the problem, drill an oversize hole, say 1/2"-3/4" based on size of fastener (At least 2-2.5 screw diameters).
Then fill it with epoxy putty made from slow epoxy and micro-balloons after sealing bottom with tape.
Allow to cure 48-72 hours, then drill a pilot hole (75% of fastener OD), and use the afore mentioned coarse thread self tapping sheet metal screw.
Guarantee you that puppy won't fail.
BTDT, hundreds of times, keep the T-Shirt.
Have fun.
Lew
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If you have to, prep the plywood by boring a transverse hole, blind if you want one side to show, and cement in a chunk of dowel. For 3/4" ply, a 5/8" Forstner bit, some glue, and the dowel has the right woodgrain to hold a transverse screw.
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On 3/2/10 1:13 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Threaded insert, maybe.
--

-MIKE-

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wrote:

If you have to, prep the plywood by boring a transverse hole, blind if you want one side to show, and cement in a chunk of dowel. For 3/4" ply, a 5/8" Forstner bit, some glue, and the dowel has the right woodgrain to hold a transverse screw.
Your reply was worth wading through tons of chaff to read - a great idea that I will retain for future use! Thanks!
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Depends on the job but Drywall screws can work well for small projects.
They should not be used for structural support but used along with glue they can provide quick assembly.
Most of all they are really inexpensive so
Use them for small things not for 2 story ladders >:oP

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