Antimicrobial Coating On Wood Framing

Does anyone use or know of a product that stops mold growth in walls after the drywall has gone up. With the houses being so air tight could this eliminate mold growth inside the walls.
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Code Guy wrote:

The key is to build the house right so there ARE no moisture/water problems. This can be done, despite builder's excuses that it can't. http://www.jlconline.com and http://www.buildingscience.com to name just two sites that might be helpful.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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We are not talking about poorly constructed homes. With homes built 99% air tight how do you control the moisture from showers, cooking and cleaning. Your web site does not address those problems.
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Code Guy wrote:

It's not my website, I just posted the links. There are houses that are "tight" and energy efficient that do not have moisture problems. That is what the sites are for. You will have to do some poking around there, I don't have direct links to exact pages on insulation, ventilation, house wraps, etc. But you might find someone who does at either of these forums:
http://bahrr.proboards32.com/index.cgi
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/build /
(Those aren't my sites either. I don't have a site.)
Bottom line is don't let any builder tell you that moisture/leaks can't be prevented or that all homes have mold. Sure, they all have mold spores in them because it's in the air. But they only become a problem if the house has defects that allow the mold to grow, mainly inside walls etc where it can do a lot of damage. I am not even going to get into the alleged health effects of mold. It's enough that it rots a house.
Good luck building, you are wise to educate yourself well, from the start.
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Code Guy wrote:

When they say the house is built 99% air-tight, they mean from the outside and from the inside. Of course you need it to be water and air tight from the outside, and the drywall and interior trim and finish should be 99% air tight from the inside. So there should be no moisture present inside the walls, and no need for anti-microbial treatment.
To address the accumulated moisture from inside the house from showers, washing dishes, etc, you need adequate ventilation to remove this humid air from the house. With a new, air-tight house, this can be difficult unless you provide replacement air. This was not as big an issue with older homes as enough replacement air would leak in around windows, under doors, etc. I would definitely get a heat recovery air exchanger if I lived in a new house.
James
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When we build houses down south (FL) new or old they all have mold in them after 2 or 3 years. Some times there is mold growing in the framing before we get the roof on. Mold is a trigger for asthma and asthma is way up since we started using house raps. My son has asthma and I will be building a new house in the next year. I was thinking if I used an Antimicrobial Coating on the interior framing that would stop all mold growth.
I have installed 2 air handlers in my HVAC on this house and I was told you are just exchanging mold spores for the outside to the inside air.
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