Air nailer lubricating oil

Question for the tool gurus out there. I went to use my finish nailer today and discovered that my bottle of lubricating oil had spilled over. I went to the only hardware store that was open this afternoon to try to find some but nada. So I picked up a bottle of Marvel Lubricating oil (http://automotive.hardwarestore.com/90-547-specialty-lubricants-/marvel-lubricating-oil-143867.aspx ). The clerk said it would work fine......I used it today, but I'm wondering if it would be safe to continue using or should I replace it with labeled air tool lubricant?
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Marvel mystery oil should be just fine.
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Using an oil not designed for air tools can damage the seals...
This stuff is acceptable:
http://power-tools.hardwarestore.com/66-389-air-tool-accessories/1-qt-nondetergent-pneumatic-oil-611548.aspx
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some finish nailers are silicon anyway. I would only use pneumatic oil in an oiled gun. I believe it is a oil like brake fluid that does not rot the rubber seals. I think you have that answer already. jloomis

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wrote:

Absolutely!

DOT 3/4 brake fluid is water based glycol solution. Interesting stuff, but doesn't combine with oil at all, and will absorbe moisture so fast your head will spin! DOT 5 silicon brake fluid is 'oil' based, however. None are terribly good lubricants compared to oils.
Now to the crux of the matter. What rots rubber is not 'oil' as such, it is the detergent that is added to virtually all oils today. Any non-detergent mineral oil (such as hydraulic oil, for example) works well, but since air-tool oil is so easily found, that is the best thing to use.
Of course, if you have a lot of heavy equipment, you probably have 5-gallon buckets of hydraulic oil (or worse, 55 gallon drums!) which could be used if you wanted to.
One other point is that the oil should come from a good maker, so that it does not have a lot of volatile components. Worse thing is when the volatile oils vaporize off, leaving a non-lubricating sludge or grease which gums up the works. This is especially true with air-tools with motors in them (such as any with circular motion).

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Don't use that stuff... Marvel does make an air-tool oil, if you like their products (they are good), or get some other brand air-tool oil. You take a real risk of ruining the seals in an air tool with the wrong oil.
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Kevin wrote:

(http://automotive.hardwarestore.com/90-547-specialty-lubricants-/marvel-lubricating-oil-143867.aspx ).

the marvel is just fine for air tools. It's all most mechanics use.
s
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Steve Barker wrote: ...

That would be a stretch for "most", methinks... :)
I've never seen it used for the purpose, myself.
For "emergency" use, it's probably ok; having looked at the stated purpose as a solvent/rust remover for bolts and the MSDS that it contains several highly volatiles (as one would expect for the stated purpose) I would _NOT_ recommend it for air tool lubrication for long term use, particularly when lubricants specific for the purpose are readily available.
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Marvel is a brand name, not a product name. They (Marvel) do make an air-tool oil, I know because that is what I use.

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PeterD wrote: ...

If you read the other posting you would recognize I know that as well. I was speaking of the particular "marvel" of the link as being unsuited to the purpose...
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Steve Barker wrote: ...

If it were this marvel instead, I'd agree... :)
<http://automotive.hardwarestore.com/90-547-specialty-lubricants-/marvel-air-tool-627436.aspx#features
In comparing MSDS, the volatiles are lower ppm in this one although not specific in ingredients and much is similar, that the other is intended as a penetrating fluid w/ some residual lubrication dictates against it as a primary lubricant.
Again, it'll work ok for a stopgap but would be better to use a dedicated-for-the-purpose lubricant in the long term
(And yes, I'm looking for something to do this am as have enough of a head cold to be restricted to quarters but not feeling badly enough to just collapse... :) )
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Thanks for all the input. That oil got me through the day yesterday, hopefully with no ill effects. I went to the regular hardware store this moring and picked up a bottle of real pneumatic oil. Should be fine now.
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