10" tread boards okay for staircase?

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Kris Krieger wrote:

Had a walk-in closet with a swing door, it smelled. I guess it was the dry cleaning fluid from my suits, and the shoe-polish. Not sure how to vent a closed closet, maybe slatted doors. Ken
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I had 4x6 ac vents in ours and the doors were undercut (we had maple laminate floors). My wife put some cedar balls in an abrasive bag and hung it on the backs of the doors so that everytime they opened the balls would be aggravated into getting up off some of that scent.
They also make a small vent (6x8) that can be installed in the wall above the doors in non-load bearing walls. Those are now required in all sleeping rooms in SW FL.
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Don wrote:

I'm not surprised that your wife has your balls hanging in the closet and that they're pissed off about it. ;)
R
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I don't think the gaps under the usual doors is enough. Slats don't go with everyone's decor...
I know what you mean, tho'. Boots, leather jackets/coats, sneakers, and so on - it can build up. And those "air fresheners" only add to the olfactory soup :p
There are prob. various ways to use some sort of spacing etc. in the door structure that'd still allow the look of a panel door - I'm mantally picturing a few ideas while typing, but I'd have to do them up in 3D before I'd have a real sense of what they might look like. Of course, they'd probably cost "too much".
OTOH, if one's decor is less "traditional", venting could be decorative, but again, I'd have to model it and render it, becasue it'd be much faster for me and much less painful for any readers, than me trying to describe what I'm picturing <g!>
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Kris Krieger wrote:

Benzene's (new car smell) may contribute to Leukemia, ((granddaugher caught that in June, but the chemo is working well and she's doing excellently, she's a super-trooper :-)).

The best theory I have is to put a cental air input into it to force some ventilation. The closet I refer to was a little warm because it had no exterior walls, but having an upper vent and a lower door vent would bleed the warm air out of the closet by convective circulation. Ken
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I appreciate the curtain idea, but that would be a little too unconventional for this house. All the doors are 4-panel white doors with white trim with a crown moulding on top, so the closet doors need to kind of match.
I know who will use your curtain idea, though--the same guy I know who's building his house without door and window trim. Now if there was only an alternative to windows... Oh, yeah! Fewer windows! Already done. And beads instead of interior doors! See, I think "The Man" steals our money by making us think we need things like windows, doors, closets, etc. I'll show the man! Actually, if I can't pay for this house, I just might be living in a tee-pee. Now *that* would be *really* be stickin' it to "The Man."
- John
Ken S. Tucker wrote:

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"Sasquatch"> wrote

Hold up Jackson. You have repeatedly said that this was going to be reminiscent of an *old farm house*. Have you ever actually seen one, walked through one? Curtained closets are exactly what you'll see there.
Short story, but amazing. I do large scale custom homes, new and remodeled, on an island named Useppa. The finished homes on Useppa START at $2mil. A vacant lot, off water, will run $850k+.
Anyway, all the homes on Useppa have names and this one home in particular was named Hemingway. The interior was designed by the leading interior design firm in FL, Robb & Stucky, in a 1940's Hemmingway style. The owner lived there for a few years and then sold the home for $3.5 mil. The new owner hired me to gut the whole thing and make it like what he wanted. No problem massah, your wish is my command. This time around the owner wanted a Hemingway theme but from the 20's rather than the 40's. By the time he was done he had put another $2.5 mil into this crib for a total of $6mil.
Now, here's the good part, back in the 20's Hemingways actual home had curtains on all the closets AND all the kitchen cabinets. Thats right, none of the cabinetsor closets in the entire house had doors on them, just curtains. This home was phenomenal. The Hemingways were quite poor in the 20's. The fauz finishers simulated mildew in the ceiling corners, spiderwebs and dust on the bullyseye glass windows, cracked marble on the hearth, splintered wood flooring, etc., etc. The most amazing thing I saw there was a simple curtain rod over the bath tub that held the shower curtain and the ID told me that rod cost $1100. Now to me it looked like a junky, rusty, bent and dented piece of pipe. But there it was none the less. That home sold last year for $7.5mil. ..... and quite frankly I wouldn't have paid $100k for it. Well, for investment purposes I would, but not to live in.
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My favorite thing is pocket doors. If I were to have a custom place, I'd ask that the design (since I like "contemporary" anyway) use pocket doors rather than hinged doors, because the latter waste so darn much space.
Curtains are the less expensive option of course. As with many things, how it looks is a function of how well the job is done, and what quality of materials are used. There are some impressive fabrics available...

Wow. But I bet it was really something to see, after it was all finished.

Well, that makes a huge amount of sense. For one thing, if the curtains get greasy or dirty, you can either wash them, ore easily replace them. Washing is easier than dusting/cleaning solid doors. And prob. most importantly, curtains allow for air circulation, which is especially important in a humid, wet, tropical climate - without it, anything that's in the closets and cabinets would get moldy very quickly. People forget all of that, because they have air conditioning. But if that AC ever goes down, well... Anyway, that's why louvered dorrs tend to be associated with tropical styles - the louveres allowed for air circulation, while the tilt maintained privacy when used for rooms and, when used for closets etc., kept the place looking neater since they also worked just as well to hide any clutter.
Curtains also can be pleasant texturally. And/or used as a focal point, if one gets a quilt-like thing (i.e. fancy needlework) or, more recently, gets some of the "scenic" fabrics that are printed much like murals. You can even have your own image printed to various types of indoor or outdoor fabric.
Fabric and louvered doors also can have a lighter or "more airy" feel than panelled doors. It all depends upon what "look" an individual wants.

Now, that part is bizarre. I doubt that a housewife of the 20's thru 60's would have let all that stuff accumulate. They *did* have Clorix back then (the smell of which I personally still associate with "cleanliness" <G!> All of the stinks they put into everything just smells to me like people are trying to mask the smell of filth - plus I'm allergic to all that junk. Hence, Clorox <L!>)

Living in a faux museum can get to be a bit of a drag, I'd think. I'm not dead-set across the board against faux finishes, but faux mildew is just too bizarre.
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Sasquatch wrote:

Those bi-fold doors that have slats or something are nice, and provide ventilation, wife's always win.

I had a 10' closet that was curtained, I didn't like the curtains so replaced those with sliding panels, I didn't like the panels so I replaced them with nicer looking curtains, and installed soft-back lighting. The backlighting keeps the closet warmer than the room and I figure it helps prevents condensation and dampness too. More than likely I was too fussy. Ken
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"Sasquatch"> wrote

The only closet doors I like are standard swing doors, like the type used for entering a room. BiFold and BiPass and Pocket doors have unneccesary baggage that haunts you everyday. Its worth the design effort to put walk-in closets in every bedroom.
Ventilated shelving is another one of my pet peeves, and I'll never use that stuff in my own home and will certainly advise my clients to not use it as well. VS is too expensive, to restrictive and looks hideous. In my last house all the storage areas, and they were considerable, had wood shelves and the clothes closets had wood rods. The 2 walk-ins in the master had built-ins. Try to stand a box of Rice-a-roni up on a ventilated pantry shelf. If you stack folded clothes on a ventilated shelf they end up looking like big corduroy.
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I differ about the doors but I do agree 100% re: those dang wire shelves.
IMO, the *easiest* thing would be, wood with laminate on the upper surface, i.e. Formica. ((I guess it'd also have to also be on the bottom, tho', to keep the wood from warping...??)) The reason I say Formica, is, ease of maintenance: doesn't chip, never gets sticky/tacky if the humidity rises, lasts a long time, smooth surface. Easy maintenence is a major consideration for me in most things, where it's aesthetically acceptable.
The wire hangar rails are crap, pure and simple. Wood is better, tho' it'd be IMO nice if thre was some sort of plastic sheath that could go over them, something like the plastic things you can put over shower- curtain rods. The hangars would slide more easily over something like that.
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Well actually that is what I really used, instead of raw wood. You can purchase melamine covered particle board in 5/8" & 3/4" thicknesses and various widths and lengths at Lowes, HD, etc. I put 1x4 melamine ledgers on the walls and then put the melamine shelving material on top of the ledgers. A little more work than the VSing but so much nicer.

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Sounds good.
Melamine, that was the word I was trying to recall. ((Nobody would ever title my biography "Total Recall" =:-o ))
You can also get melamine paint.
One thing I wonder about is, why melamine or even enamel paint isn't used on shelving, trim, and any/all other high-use surfaces. I guess latex is just cheaper. Or maybe people think that Melamine or enamel would look "cheap" or something...? Personally, in at least certain instances, I like the look of enamel, esp. when contrasted with matte surfaces. But for any high-use areas, it seems like it'd make so much sense - the latex gets too easily dinged, and IMO, gloss is gloss - if the shelving, trims, etc. are going to be painted with high-gloss latex anyway, enamel would IMO just look better - and for longer!
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Working at the office, I got to see a lot of laminates and rubber floors and general workaday materials. Fairly impressed with what's available these days. Probably should have paid more attention to costs. But there were some darned nice looking, even fun things going on in laminates. And some hideous stuff but that's all relative. What you saying 'bout my cousin? Me, I'm all for Corian (yeah, by brand, the others just don't seem to look as nice) and concrete for the kitchen counter.
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"gruhn"

I'm with you there too I think... What do you think about terrazzo-type floorings or stainless-steel kitchen counters that bend up to form a backsplash? Then again, how about kitchen islands away from the walls?
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I like the laminate panels as art/hobby surfaces. They can be put onto a light board with a treated back, and be taken up and put away when you're not using the surface are tough and cleanable (you can get paint splatters off and then have a smooth surface for drawing), yet at the same time, inexpensive enough so that one can have one surface for modeling clay and concrete, another surface for painting, a third for drawing, and so on.
Frankly, I'm toying with the idea of possibly using laminate (if I can find a suitable color/patter) for at least part of the bathroom wall, as a sort of wainscotting. Still have a slew of other things to do first, but it's a thought ;)
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Say what?

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