Sanitizing kitchen

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Lie. Before antibiotics showed up, those infected with the worst bugs were just left to die. That is why parents of that era were so obsessed about disinfecting, those consequences.
The worst of those bugs around around anymore, they were wiped out by antibiotics, to be replaced by others due to antibiotic resistance half a century or so later.
If it was as simple as that stupid woman claims in her article, we wouldnt see hospitals as the worst places for bad bugs today, because they could just continue to use bleach etc and wipe out those bugs that have developed antibiotic resistance in hospitals. Doesnt happen, because she is just plain wrong.
And this bit is flagrantly dishonest
Unlike antibiotics, current scientific evidence does not demonstrate a link between the use of antimicrobial-biocidal products and the emergence of biocide or antibiotic resistance.2,3
Turns out that those two references are to 2. Anderson RL, Carr JH, Bond WW, Favero MS. Susceptibility
of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci to Environmental Disinfectants.
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 1997; 18: 195-199.
3. Rutala WA, Stiegel MM, Sarubbi FA, Weber DJ. Susceptibility
of Antibiotic-Susceptible and Antibiotic-Resistant Hospital Bacteria
to Disinfectants. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 1997; 18: 417-421.
Those two are clearly NOT discussing resistance to the use of
bleach etc at all.
http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/articles/131topics.html

Pity they dont eliminate them. Funny that.

Lie. Doesnt explain why the use of bleach in hospitals hasnt stopped those antibiotic resistant organisms in their tracks.
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Rod Speed wrote:

It does on the surface it's being applied to.
Tell us how using bleach on a kitchen counter will "breed better bugs".
Explain to us how a germ will develop resistance to being physically destroyed.
We know how germs develope anti-biological resistance, so explain the other for us.
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Lie, it isnt even possible to apply it to all surfaces effectively.

The same way that anything that doesnt kill 100% does, cretin.

The same way that anything that doesnt kill 100% does, cretin.

The same way that anything that doesnt kill 100% does, cretin.
And just how many of you are there between those ears, wanker ?
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Rod Speed wrote:

And that answers the objection that if disinfectants could kill germs very effectively why hospitals still have nasty microbes running around. The answer is that hospitals still hvae nasty microbes running around for two reasons: one, they are full of germ factories (also known as "patients"); two, it is not possible to evacuate all the air from the hospital and then submerge the entire hospital in bleach or some other disinfectant. There are going to be spots which are missed.
- Logan
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Nope, what is possible in hospitals is completely different to kitchens.

That problem was solved more than a century ago with isolation wards etc.

The worst of them arent airborne.

How odd that that works with surgerys and surgical instruments.

Perfectly possible to santize the wards so patients that dont arrive with a bad bug dont get infected in the hospital.
And that is in fact done in the research operations that do research on the worst of the bad bugs.
The problem is that when those extreme measures arent used, you dont get 100% kills with bleach, so you do breed bad bugs.
Its stupid to be doing that in a kitchen where normal cleanliness is perfectly adequate.
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Rod Speed wrote:

Give some examples, otherwise you're just talking out of your germ ridden ass.
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Already did, what was seen before antibiotics showed up, when the best there was was bleach, phenolics, alcohol, iodine etc.
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Rod Speed wrote:

I think you mean phenols here. Phenolics are phenol-derived resins.
HTH. HAND.
--
Cheers, Bev
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
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Nope.
That is just a subset of phenolics, http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/hcs300/biochem3.htm

DWT. KUYH.
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Rod Speed wrote:

Iodine is still used. When I had surgery to correct my majorly screwed up toenail, the hospital staff told me I had to rub some iodine stuff all over the lower half of my whole leg thoroughly. By your logic, this is a bad practice because it breeds iodine resistant bacteria. Nevertheless, it is still a standard thing to do before an operation.
- Logan
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So is bleach. Separate issue entirely to whether bad bugs were seen before antibiotics were invented.

That is massive overkill. I didnt need anything like that with major knee surgery.

Wrong. I never said that sanitizing isnt useful in hospitals, JUST that its very undesirable in KITCHENS where it breeds bad bugs.

Never ever said it wasnt.
Alcohol is still used before injections etc too.
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Rod Speed wrote:

Even lethal ones.
--
Cheers,
Bev
=====================================================
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Rod Speed wrote:

Wow, Rod knows more than the people doing the prep for surgery! He should be getting paid to tell the hospitals and doctors that they are all wrong.

No surprise there as most people on welfare recieve sub-standard medical care.
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I know that few bother with that level of prep with toenails, cretin.

Never ever had a cent of welfare in my entire life thanks liar.
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Rod Speed wrote:

It is doled out in dollars.
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Even on welfare Rod still has access to the counseling that he needs. Inability to ever admit error is a major reason no one will hire him.
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Rod Speed wrote:

How do the germs know whether they're in a kitchen or someplace else like a hospital? It seems like germs would respond to the same chemical in the same way no matter where the germs are located. If it breeds bad bugs in a kitchen, then it will in a hospital too, and vice versa. If it did breed bad bugs, then why would hospitals disinfect things at such a critical time as right before an operation?
- Logan
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 01:50:24 GMT, Logan Shaw

They look in a mirror. If they're wearing an apron and chef hat, they know they're in the kitchen, and prepare to selectively breed and mutate while sharpening their little cleavers.
--Vic
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By the thoroughness of the 'sanitizing'

They dont necessarily get the same chemical as in a hospital where real care is taken to ensure that the right mixture of say bleach is used which ensure enough active ingredient, let alone the same level of application to everywhere like the floors etc.

Wrong, what matters is those that dont get killed.

Because they can ensure that its done right with a very high kill rate.
That was not however enough before antibiotics were invented.
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Part of the anti-biotics-resistancy problem is simply mis-use.
Over-Exposure - patients insisting on anti-biotics even for viral infections - and stopping them to early, i.e. putting them away when the sickness has passed, but not all bacteria have been killed.
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