Pressure Vacuum Cleaner for Whole House

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Whole house vacuum clearer systems have access ports (inlets) where a user can plug-in a flexible pick-up tube. Behind the access ports are tubes that lead to a central vacuum clearer. The user aims the end of the flexible pick-up tube at the dirt, and the suction takes the dirt via the tubes to a container in the central vacuum cleaner. This article describes one setup: http://snipurl.com/ottj
The vacuum cleaner itself is larger and perhaps has a quieter motor than portable units, but it's conventional in design. A fan covered by a dust filter provides the suction.
But what about positioning the motor and fan on the other side of the dirt? Make the house airtight, and when using the vacuum close the usual exhaust ports, like the ones for the kitchen and bathrooms. Make an opening from the outside of the house to the inside, and have a fan in it blowing through a filter (for pollen etc.) toward the inside. In other words, have a fan that pressurizes the house. Behind each access port, have a tube goes directly to a screened-in container outside. The user closes up the house, starts the pressurizing fan, and uses the flexible pick-up tubes as in the conventional arrangement. Dust and gases get removed from the house, and the larger pieces of trash get caught in the screened-in containers.
I see advantages to this kind of system:
The tube system is simple and cheap.
Short tubes going outside are unlikely to clog.
Instead of capturing most of the dust as with a conventional unit, you exhaust the dust to the outside. This exhaust doesn't need much of a filter. A screen would prevent you from littering the neighborhood.
Relatively clean incoming air goes to the fine filter. This would need infrequent replacement.
Pick-up tubes can be different sizes.
There's a possibility of quiet operation.
Would this be a practical system? Has anybody ever seen anything like it?
--
(||) Nehmo (||)


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Nehmo Sergheyev wrote:

and cook (other than marriage) let me know!
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I wouldn't use a Dyson to stop my car rolling down the road.
Buy a Henry and with the money you save...a lifetime supply of bags.
D
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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 21:31:59 +0100, Vortex wrote:

or not: I was wondering whether I'd have to buy some new bags for our new Henry or whether I could get away with emptying and re-using the one that came with it. It seemed to be getting quite heavy (lots of small building debris) so I opened it up to see and found that the paper bag was split and so it was only the cloth filter doing the work. Seemed OK so that's how I left it (after emptying it, natch).
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It wouldn't even be any good for that. Crunch, crunch, followed by the sight of your car rolling away ...
--
"Other people are not your property."
[email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
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wrote:

No but inevitably it's going to come down one side or the other. Your sucker blows. OR Your blower sucks.
Plummeting swan filters would add some topicality.
--
Regards,
Mike Halmarack
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my dad made a interesting observation about his brand new home with central vac.
he remarked and my step mom agreed the central vacs hose is harder to manuver and manipulate than a standard vac. although it probably cleans a bit better
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It would not be practical because 1. You would never be able to seal a house as well as you wanted and if you did, you would not be able to sell the concept to many customers. You would need to seal better than tyou would for caulking cold air entry.
2. You could not open a door or have kids entering or leaving the house while you cleaned. "Kids we are on lockdown until I finish blowing the dirt out" (it is not a vacuum)
3. It will hurt your ears when you have a bad sinus day due to the rising and falling baromatric pressure in the house.
4. Air is compressable, so even if you switched on a compressor with X cfm airflow, the airflow at the exit port would be less and delayed acording to how much air volume in the house there is. Airflow would be slow at the exit port.
4. Most of the compressed air in the room would flow right over the dirt to get to the exit tube, leaving most of the dirt inside the carpet.
5. It would force dust further into the carpet as air leaked through the unsealed subfloor
Can I blow any more holes in your idea.
It would and does work for smoke removal though.
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Nehmo Sergheyev wrote:

You missed April Fool's Day by 6 days....
This has to be a troll, nobody could be THAT stupid...
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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many stupid posts. This guy's handle shows up robustly on google with lots of no nonsense posts. An inventive dreamer perhaps.
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Nehmo Sergheyev wrote:

First problem. Dust becomes airbourne, choking user and leaving dust on every vertical surface.
--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
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message

Not to mention every horizontal surface, :)
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Glenn wrote:

Don't mention that :-)
I'll get my coat.................
--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
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If you are sufficiently far away from the pressurizing fan, there won't be any perceptible wind at all. The fan will create pressure more than flow. A conventional cleaning vacuum works by a difference in pressure between the room and the catch chamber (the tank of a shop vac perhaps). In the arrangement I'm considering, there still is the difference in pressure, but this time it's between the room and the great outdoors.
--
(||) Nehmo (||)


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Nehmo Sergheyev wrote:

First real air tight house is not easy to build. If you pressurize I don't think it has to be air tight. Real problem is how big a turbine? Air liners do that.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Nehmo - I haven't done any of the math regarding how large the pressurizing fan should be or what pressure should be achieved. But a rough estimate is possible: To simplify the problem, let's say the house has no vents, no plumbing fixtures, no gas appliances, and the house is of an almost airtight modern construction. I often use a 6.5 amp (120 Volts) shop vac and get respectable results. I imagine using an 11 amp fan (I have one) as the pressuring means would get reasonable results at the pick-up tube.
The next step in something like this is to experiment a bit.
Tony Hwang

Nehmo - Airline cabin pressure can go as low as 75% one atmosphere or equivalant to an altitude of 8,000 feet. http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/atmosphere/q0206a.shtml The fact isn't relevant. I just found it while looking around and I thought I'd share it:-)
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Possible: Maybe Practical: No way Effective: Barely
Implemented correctly you get: Boy in a bubble, Clean room, Positive pressure
Don't forget, if you run this in winter you will throw away at least two house fulls of heated air you paid for.
Cost effective: not a chance
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wrote:

I don't have a dog in this fight but my shop vac pulls about 40" of water with a nrew bag. That is about 1/10 of an atmosphere or about 1.4 pounds. Not a lot of pressure but I bet it will blow the roof off.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Only if your roof weighs less than 100 tonnes.
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gfretwell -

Nehmo - What size motor does your shop vac have?
gfretwell -

Nehmo - Considering the inevitable leaks, it would take an enormous compressing fan to blow the roof off. (Your shop vac turned around wouldn't make that pressure in a house.) I'm thinking of a fan something on the order of 500 watts to 1KW. I'm not sure what pressure differential that would create in a tight house, but I suspect it would be enough to do some cleaning.
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