Odor in sheets

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I pulled out my cotton and polyester sheets after using flannel sheets all winter and they had a terrible odor. I have very sensitive skin and serious allergies so I have to use laundry detergent that is odorless and for sensitive skin. In the past I would have probably add some vinegar to my rinse water, but I am also now allergic to vinegar! (it falls under mold foods because it is fermented). Any suggestions for freshening them?
Thank you!
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On Wed, 16 May 2007 21:26:54 -0400, "Autumn"

Hang them outside for an hour on a sunny day. The UV will freshen them.
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Better still, wash them first, then hang out to dry in sunshine.
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I would have suggested that as well, but don't know if OP has access to clotheslines and sunshine.
Aspasia
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I have been bugging my hubby for a clothes line. I do like that suggestion best. Maybe I can find a few trees to tie a rope to for a few wash loads. Might be able to find a few that would work. Trees that is.
Thanks for the suggestions, it is appreciated.
Autumn
<>>Hang them outside for an hour on a sunny day. The UV will freshen

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On Wed, 30 May 2007 22:24:36 -0400, "Autumn"

In the long run, you can cause damage to a tree or even kill it by tying a clothes line around it. Plus, a clothesline attached to a tree can have ill effects on nesting birds, can agitate bees feeding on nectar, or your clean clothes may be the target of bird droppings. Do it right and erect two clothes line poles anchored in concrete, preferably away from trees.
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Phisherman wrote:

I wonder what that costs in materials and labor. If the posts aren't braced, won't they eventually tip? You create a permanent obstruction that makes mowing more difficult, limits the use of your yard, and could injure somebody.
The umbrella or rotary clothes dryer, invented in America in 1855, has several advantages.
1. You spend $35 on the unit and make one hole.
2. You stand in one spot with your basket and pins.
3. You can quickly fold and store it, keeping it clean and leaving no obstruction.
4. You can add a cloth cover to use it as a beach umbrella so you can sit and smoke out of the sun and rain without stinking up your house.
5. That cover also allows you to dry your vividly dyed clothes without sun fading. (My bright red shirt has turned pink from too much time in the sun!)
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Denominator wrote:

You make some reasonable points however the rotary clothes drier was not successful for my neighbours nor for my friends. All have returned to a decent clothes line. My posts have been stood upright in concrete for over 40 years, I know of others over 100 years old. Obviously the job was first class when done and if one doesn't employ a cowboy then all should be well. I agree the posts can be " in the way" whilst mowing but it doesn't take a great deal of time to snip around the base with shears and it has the benefit of many happy hours of volleyball and tennis type games played over the line, dancing around the poles or even ON the poles. ( I keep my clothes on) The rotary became unstable after a few years use and the hole needed plugging for the pole to stay upright, it also rusted. I like to see my sheets billowing in the breeze, not hanging limply touching other items on the line and becoming entangled. My dear neighbour has a retractable line. I like it. One end is on the house wall, neat and compact, the other can be hooked somewhere else when needed, he has a place on the nearby shed to hook it when he does his smalls but he can also extend it to a fence post further down the garden for larger items.

A disgusting habit. I am looking forward to England becoming smoke free - next month I believe, Wales and Scotland have already done it and it was very successful, a pleasure to visit both places now.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

Around here, we're more modest. When people come to dance around my pole, I take down my clothes first. I take them indoors.

Sounds like a cowboy installed it.

The only thing that can cause limply hanging clothes to become entangled is dancing around the pole.

A long line might impress neighbors like you, but it can be a nuisance when larger items are hung on it.

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Enumerator wrote:

Have you not heard of a prop?
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

his prop. I try not to hang it out except when I'm using it, but sometimes I forget.
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I'm not really sure what that means. But it made me laugh.
peggo
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peggo wrote:

Quiet and unassuming on the ground, Dick Bong was a different person in the air. His radio language was sometimes so raw that it was said by many to make the most jaded listeners blush.
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Enumerator wrote:

under my line.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

dance since the Eagle Squadron made it compulsory in 1940.
Perhaps you're obsessing over David Hasselhoff:
video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7301858593253108831
(You won't be able to see it without a modern internet connection.)
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Enumerator wrote:

You tease!
( For readers information I have lost my wi-fi internet connection at home and have had to revert to dial up. I am awaiting the installation of broadband so I can resume posting to the groups on a more regular basis)
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

to see him sing, "Get into my Car." You'll be able to see him eat his supper on the floor.
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Autumn wrote:

to white vinegar you could try acetic acid.
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On Sat, 19 May 2007 16:11:20 -0400, Denominator

Acetic acid IS vinegar!!!
Can you use a cold-water wash like Coolove?
Or good old-fashioned Ivory Flakes?
Or a special product made for baby linen and clothing?
With these, you may not need to add anything to your rinse water.
Do a double rinse just to be on the safe side.
At this Web site:
http://www.factorydirectsuperstore.com/Persil.htm
they advertise a Persil product that says it's formulated for allergies and sensitive skin.
By Googling keywords like "laundry detergent for sensitive skin with allergies" you will find other companies advertising similar products.
Good luck.
Aspasia
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aspasia wrote:

Utter tripe. My pickled eggs and cabbages are second to none, only good quality pickling vinegar will do the job in MY home.
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