Mops advice

Recently, my heavy duty mop finally fell apart. Now this mop was great. Once my bathroom floor flooded completely and I was able to mop up about an inch of water.
Well, now I've gone to replace it, and I couldn't find an old fashioned heavy duty mop. I'm not sure what to call it. I call it "the poop deck mop" hehe. I'm sure you know what I mean.
Anyway, this new mop had the strings about the pole. I can't figure how to use the thing. Everytime I go to wring the water out, the top end comes lose, and its a no-win situation. I've had to resort to paper towels to mop.
So, my question is: I'd like to replace my old fashtioned heavy-duty mop. But, most stores these days seem to stock mostly this new "advanced" version with the strings wrapped around a pole that supposed to wring out by twisting it (yeah right) or the sponge mop version.
Does a sponge mop do a good job, or would I be better off looking for the old fashioned mop I'm talking about. Where can you find them now? Do hardware stores stock them? The only ones I've found so far, the cotton end is separate from the pole end. Well, my mop is already broken, and I'm already disillusioned with this screw on variety. Basically, I find that my old mop held a lot of water and was easier to wring out manually, than this new fangled version that's supposed to wring water out.
Anyway, thanks for any advice on where to find a good old fashioned mop.
Larry
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Check out Home Depot. That's where I used to get mine. Big, fluffy, string mop heads that slip into the mop holder are apparently the favorites of many people, and last I checked Home Depot still carried them.
I'm like you, I don't like the wimpy little versions they sell at grocery stores, or sponge mops of any kind. Even if that's what the wife wants used on her new laminate tile floors. I'm hanging onto my old mop in case she ever changes her mind. :)
Good luck.
Dave snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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wrote:
My favorite mop head is a Seco/Rubbermaid X-large, cotton blend; looped ends, sewn-in tail band and one inch head band--in blue. Beautiful in form and function. :-)
With a little care, this head will last most households for many years. If you use a quat in your cleaning, the mop head will load up with anionic resins, but a good laundry cycle solves that problem.
My favorite mop handle is a 62 inch aluminum Invader, by Rubbermaid.
Custodial supply stores always have a wide selection of mops, etc.
Michael When I die, I want to go where dogs go!
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I've never really understood the use of the traditional mop. Unless you put the thing through the washer after each use, it seem that all you are doing is mopping with a dirty clump of strings. Then there is the issue of the bucket and the wringing of the mop. Maybe my floors don't get dirty enough to need a traditional mop. I have a steam mop and find it quiet satisfactory. I simply sweep up any debris with a broom or a dry Swiffer. Then I use the steam mop on the floors. It is quick, quite, uses no chemicals or buckets of water. You don't have to wring it out or find a place to put a big, drippy mop after you use it. After I use the mop, I put the dirty cloth into the wash. The steam mop has the ability to disinfect the floor, unlike a traditional mop. I got mine at Tuesday Morning for $39, but they are available elsewhere for between $49 and $70. You can see it here http://tinyurl.com/yt8r2
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If a floor needs a little scrubbing, an old-fashioned heavy mop has the weight to scrub if you simply slide it around. With rinse water and a good wringer, you can mop with fairly clean strings. A good string mop with a good wringer will let you remove almost all the water, which removes almost all the dirt. As was noted, it's also an efficient way to pick up several gallons of water.

Can you put down a lot of water and remove it as completely as wiping with a wrung-out towel?

The ad says it can sanitize. That means keeping the amount of pathogens within general health standards. Traditional mopping is supposed to do that, too. I don't know, but I suppose you need to take your time if you want to kill a lot of germs with a small steam mop.
--
Best Regards,
Lloyd

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wrote:

With a steam mop, the steam dissolves the mess without the need to scrub. I guess if like to scrub you shouldn't consider a steam mop.
With rinse water and a

The bucket of water and the winger are unnecessary with a steam mop. If you like to tote a buck of water around and wring out the mop then you shouldn't consider a steam mop.
As was noted, it's also an efficient way

I have a shop vack for that. I find that more efficient than the mop. The only times that I recall having the need to remove water from a floor was when I used a conventional mop and accidentally knocked over the bucket!

You don't have to put down a lot of water when using a steam mop. In fact, the floor is dry within seconds which is another advantage.

The instructions that came with my mop says that it kills ecoli and salmonella when the mop is in contact with the floor for 8 seconds. Your mop may actually be spreading bacteria.
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