How well do organic cleaners work than the regular cleaners?

I can't stand the smells of harsh chemicals when I clean my bathroom and am looking for an alternative. I've been looking at these organic cleaning products,:
http://kokogm.com/Green_Market/CleaningStore.html
but was wondering if they really kill the bacteria in toilets and mildew in showers? When they say 'clean,' do they mean killing bacteria as well? I just don't want anything "growing" in my bathroom.
Thanks, Julie
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On 28 Sep 2006 08:16:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Where on their site does it say their products are organic? They list no ingredients or offer MSDS, no AOAC reports or results from any testing agency. They claim that their products are "environmentally friendly", but they don't explain what that means, or what makes their products that way. However, that was not your primary concern: strong scents are.
Good custodial supply stores offer hospital grade detergent-disinfectants and other cleaning products without perfumes and/or colors. Perfumes and colors are added for specific reasons, but cleaning effectiveness is not one of them.
________________________ If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space.
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On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 16:37:37 -0400, Michael A. Ball

Very interesting -- about perfume-free sources.
I have been ticked off for ages that I can't find clothes washer detergents without icky perfumes. And I'm not even allergic! Imagine a person with allergies trying to find reasonable priced detergents in their neighborhood supermarket! Nothing! Aisles and aisles of detergents with all kinds of fancy PR names for perfume.
Why isn't there more complaint!!! The only thing I can find is Arm & Hammer and even they don't always have "free" detergents.
I will certainly checkd out custodial supply store for their products and prices.
Come the Revolution...
Aspasia
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On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:57:33 -0700, aspasia wrote:

The public is constantly programmed to associate clean with scent. In some cases, things don't actually have to be clean--just smell great. The laundry is a prime example of that. If the scent doesn't burn one's nose, the laundry might not be fresh and/or clean.
There are so few fragrance-free detergents because they are not what the public demands; therefore companies can't afford to manufacture them. Even though I don't associate cleanliness with scent, I can't afford to process laundry for my business that lacks a "fresh" scent.
Oh, more consumers don't complain because they don't believe their opinions and preferences will make any difference. _________________________ Zildjan: world class cymbal of excellence.
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I can't stand most parfumes. I don't care for them in cleaning products or on people. I don't understand why people douse themselves with the stuff. I actually get migraines from the stuff. I went to a Doctor's office once that had a sign up saying no perfumes or strong scents. Once I smelled this lady and I asked her what Shampoo she had used. She just beamed as she told me the name of this very expensive shampoo. I didn't have the heart to tell her the scent was the same that was used in my store brand Dog Shampoo. To this day I associate the smell with stinking wet dogs. I wonder if it is just Americans that are in love with these strong scents or is it everyone? I wrote a comment about the Over Powering Floral smell in my dentist's office on there suggestion card. OMG. The next visit I was in the Dentist's Private office being asked about it. I told him I was trying to be very polite and tactful but I often had to wait outside on my husband because of the smell. The Doc said he used the stuff to mask the smell of the disinfectants. I told him I understood that but I still thought the floral scent was way too much. He actually did tone it down.
EG
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On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 16:37:37 -0400, Michael A. Ball

Very interesting -- about perfume-free sources.
I have been ticked off for ages that I can't find clothes washer detergents without icky perfumes. And I'm not even allergic! Imagine a person with allergies trying to find reasonable priced detergents in their neighborhood supermarket! Nothing! Aisles and aisles of detergents with all kinds of fancy PR names for perfume.
Why isn't there more complaint!!! The only thing I can find is Arm & Hammer and even they don't always have "free" detergents.
I will certainly checkd out custodial supply store for their products and prices.
Come the Revolution...
Aspasia
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On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 14:59:04 -0700, aspasia wrote:

OK, I did visit a local, long-established custodial supply store. Guess what -- they had NO perfume-free detergents! The polite store clerk explained that people actually PREFER the scented detergents, and mfgrs don't make the non-scented because not enough demand. [expletive deleted] !!!
I can't afford to pay shipping on heavy boxes of detergent, even in case some perfume-free ones are sold on-line.
Gotta be a solution out there somewhere...
Aspasia
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Now that I think of it, when we were out of laundry detergent, my mom used to wash our clothes in the bathtub with some dish washing liquid. (our washing machine was half broken) I'm not sure if there's unscented dish liquid out there but it's definitely lighter than a box of laundry detergent.
Julie
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Not sure if dish wash liquid is properly formulated for clothes washing. Anybody know?
You can sometimes find, I think it's Sun Light, or some name like that, unscented, clothes wash liquid in the Big Lots stores or other outlets.
I always wondered about comparative efficiency of liquid and powder detergents.
Anybody know if this has been researched properly, and if so, what were the results?
TIA
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Yes! That was what she used, Sun Light. I think they have different cleaners for different jobs and not all cleaners are the same to an extent but our clothes were fine with dish detergent. They were a little "crisp" but then we didn't have a clothes dryer either. They smelled like the outdoors because we hung them on a washline. :)
I don't see any harm using dish detergent on grease stains in clothing, after all, it does cut through grease.
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On Fri, 06 Oct 2006 13:44:52 -0700, aspasia wrote:

Dishwashing liquid can be used in the laundry in a pinch, although I don't recommend it. Using laundry detergent or dishwashing liquid in the dishwasher might put suds all over the kitchen floor.
You can wash lightly soiled clothing by soaking in the clothes washer overnight, then running them through the regular wash cycle with good results. Consumer Reports did a study using the "miracle wash doughnut" compared with soaking clothes in plain water--both did equally well; it was found that the soaking part was what did the cleaning. You can add a cup of baking soda to the laundry instead of soap for odor-free clothes. This works well for deer hunters.
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On 28 Sep 2006 08:16:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Often I use Tide-Free powder as a general cleaner. It has absolutely no smell and kills most bacteria. Hot or very warm water works better. Any soap or salt will kill bacteria, but I have not heard of "organic" soap. I don't know anything better than household bleach for killing mildew/mold. I have no mold/mildew growth by keeping the bath dry and well-ventilated--I use a timer wall switch that runs a fan 20 minutes after a shower.
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Hmm.. I visited a bunch of organic household products when I came across that site so that's why I probably said "organic."
Thank you for your tips and suggestions. I will look further into it. :)
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bottle. It is concentrated too.. hth.
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On 28 Sep 2006 08:16:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Julie,
Buyer beware. I think a lot of companies use the term "Organic" very loosely. Kind of like "All-Natural" with means....................absolutely nothing.
EG
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Ohh don't worry, I'm a compulsive label reader. :)
I'm with you on the perfume bit. It gives me a headache after a while - same thing goes with cigarette smoke. Ick!
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