handiwipes

Lloyd Randall likes handiwipes for cleaning soap scum.
I like them in the kitchen. They can be squeezed almost dry with one hand. They dry pretty fast when hung up, which helps keep them from getting *smelly*. When squeezed out, they will pick up water almost as completely as a towel. That makes them good for drying counters or washed items. You can get most of the grease out of a handiwipe with hot water and squeezing. That makes them efficient for wiping a lot of grease off a stovetop.
A handiwipe is perfect for seasoning a skillet. First you wash with a handiwipe. Then you squeeze it and use it to dry. Then you add a drop of canola oil to the skillet and wipe it around with the handiwipe. You can get most of the oil out of the handiwipe by running hot water on it and squeezing. (Then you salt the pan and heat. Canola is great for this because it turns to varnish so fast.)
Does everyone love handiwipes? Is there a better choice? So far, this is a *very* nice thread. Let's not spoil it with foolish comments!
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What are they?
Is there a better choice?
I like pastry brushes and sponge type wipe ups
So far,

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Clorox owns the brand, Handi Wipes. Chicopee Mills invented them in the 1950s. They were the first nonwoven fabric available to consumers.
I think they are rayon. They're good for washing and drying my "Barbecue Bob and the Spare Ribs" LPs. Some use them instead of cheesecloth to strain food. They withstand alkalines but not acids or concentrated bleach. In the food service industry, they last 1 to 3 days.

I don't know. As dishrags, they are good for getting into corners. They can be squeezed and used damp as towels. The cost about 40 cents apiece and may last weeks in the kitchen.

--
Best Regards,
Lloyd

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wrote:

I thought a handiwipe would be like a wetwipe, small, impregnated with something to assist it in doing the intended job.
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It's *so* confusing! Since Chicopee Mills developed Handi Wipes in the 1950s, the brand name has also become a generic term which seems to include moistened wipes.
I don't know what Chicopee Mills developed the Handi Wipe. About the time of WWI, the Chicopee Manufacturing Company started up in existing cotton-mill buildings in Manchester NH. It was known as Chicopee Mills and closed in 1975.
In 1927, Johnson & Johnson built a mill village near Gainesville GA to make gauze and bandages. They called it Chicopee Mills. Their J Cloth was produced there. That Chicopee Mills closed in 1993, but Johnson & Johnson still has a Chicopee Division.
Another Chicopee Mills, in Milltown NJ, makes the Miracloth. It's a rayon polyester that laboraties use to filter microbes. Their address is also listed as NY and La Jolla CA.
The original Chicopee textile mills started in Chicopee MA, originally part of Springfield, in 1825. They were booming in 1898. I don't know when they closed.
--
Best Regards,
Lloyd

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wrote:

pans and oiling and milk on pastry then nothing else. The sponge for worktops and sink. It soaks up the wet more than the wipe. I use wipes for dirty jobs. I wouldn't want the wipe to get mixed up and then use it for my sink if it had been used for a toilet.
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tissues in toilet stalls. Instead, students and faculty carry reusable nonwoven towels wherever (and whenever) they go.
--
Nan (NOT the notorious TROLL!)

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wrote:

after they've been.
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Toilets here in Japan spray you down and dry you off.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Homer Brewer) wrote in message

They are SO handy! Once I had lipstick on my monitor ( don't ask) and the handiwipe took it straight off!
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I cut them in half. Take one half then one paper towel, folded in half, place in center of handiwipe. Use for Clorox mop - when finished cleaning floor - throw away paper towel and rinse out Handiwipe. Reuse. The dirt goes into paper towel and very little is on Handiwipe.
Dorothy
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