Green Cleaning craze

Apparently there is a "green cleaning" craze going on (it's about time). From ABC News:
<snip>... If people have the time, there are also inexpensive ways to "eco-clean" your own home. Rangan points out that combining basic household items, such as white vinegar, baking soda, olive oil, borax, water and lemon, can work just as well as any premium-priced product.
"There's a little bit of science behind it so you're not just using lemon on everything," she said. "But making your own formulations is pretty easy."
Below are a few natural cleaning tips from GreenerChoice.org, an independent, nonprofit group that collaborates with the Consumer policy Institute. A more complete list of cleaning formulations is available here:
http://www.eco-labels.org/greenconsumers/products.cfm?product=greencleaning&page=RightChoices
Ovens: Mix one cup of baking soda and 1/4 cup of washing soda, then add enough water to make a paste; apply the paste to oven surfaces and let soak overnight. The next morning, lift off soda mixture and grime. Tub and tile: Mix 1 2/3 cup of baking soda, 1/2 cup of liquid soap, and 1/2 of cup water. As the last step, add two tablespoons of vinegar (if you add the vinegar too early it will react with the baking soda.) Immediately apply, wipe and scrub.
Toilet bowl: Pour one cup of borax into the toilet before going to bed. In the morning, scrub and flush. For an extra-strength cleaner, add 1/4 cup of vinegar to the borax.
Furniture: Mix olive oil and vinegar in a one-to-one ratio and polish with a soft cloth.
Windows: Put three tablespoons of vinegar per one quart water in a spray bottle. For extra-dirty windows, try 1/2 teaspoon of liquid soap, three tablespoons of vinegar, and two cups of water. Shake well.
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Phisherman wrote:

I do try to be green. We should all be making an effort. I had two money off vouchers this week for products by a company that respects the planet so I will toddle off to the shops to investigate. On reading past posts I see Mr F Bentos recommended a similar method of oven cleaning to the paste one and didn't I recently give a tip for linseed oil and vinegar as polish? You will find it at Google under the heading "duster tip"
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

so
oven
"duster
Good to see you again Mrs. B....
As far as my oven goes I simply put a container of ammonia in it and let it sit overnight. It's fairly easy to clean then...the surfaces of my oven are removable and I just take them out and wipe them down. Far preferable to that expensive and very toxic commerical oven cleaner spray...I frankly cannot abide the odour of it :-|
That ammonia "method" works well for other things that need cleaning. Put the dirty items in a plastic garbage bag, put a pan/container of ammonia in and tie the bag shut. A day or two later take the item(s) out and they'll clean right up. This is especially good for bbq grille grates, etc. Don't try this with aluminum things however, as IIRC ammonia and aluminum are reactive to each other...
--
Best
Greg



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Gregory Morrow wrote:

Thank you Gregory. Very sweet of you to say it. I have been rather quiet lately due to a spate of decorating.

Are they really? I know I cannot use soda with aluminium. I haven't any ammonia in the house, it is not something I tend to use except if it's already in a product. You are extremely fortunate to have removeable liners, how I wish I didn't have to get down on my knees, head in oven every Sunday after lunch.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

Can't you find something more to decorate?

That's a myth. Aluminum is used in commercial refrigeration because ammonia doesn't affect it. For those who worry about tarnish, ammonium hydroxide will tarnish aluminum.
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Phisherman wrote:

http://www.eco-labels.org/greenconsumers/products.cfm?product=greencleaning&page=RightChoices
The specific gravity of borax is 1.78. The solubility at 20 C is 30 g/l. So it would take about 4 gallons to dissolve a cup of borax. That's some toilet bowl!
I wonder if there would really be any benefit to letting borax sit in the bowl overnight. Anyway, what if somebody has to go?
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Phisherman wrote:

http://www.eco-labels.org/greenconsumers/products.cfm?product=greencleaning&page=RightChoices
Is that to clean the Superbowl? At room temperature it would take about 4 gallons of water to dissolve a cup of borax.
I wonder if there would really be any benefit to letting borax sit in the bowl overnight. Anyway, what if somebody had to go?
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Sawney Beane wrote:

and I say its not the "bowl under water" where the borax would work that needs help, its the area between the water and the rim of the toidy bowl that has the greater need. Surely the borax is not going to "bubble" up high enough to clean that! So, starting over................what do you use to clean the REAL toilet problem?
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BootHill_Lady wrote:

Scrub with a paste of borax and vinegar?
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