fried bacon troubles.

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-- wrote:

It's just a sophomoric quibble -- the kind I like. "Pre-cooked" can mean "cooked before", as in "prefabricated" or it can bean "before being cooked", as in "pre-school". Consider your leg properly pulled. (But whichever meaning one adopts, pre-cooked bacon certainly exists.)
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

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What would YOU call bacon before it's cooked?
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Bob Ward wrote:
...

raw; uncooked
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Jerry Avins wrote:

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Choreboy wrote:

As far as I know, they put that there make the fat look more pristine. It also holds down any rancid odors. Do you remember that wine used to be kept from spoiling by adding must boiled down to syrup in a lead pan?
Trying to keep a straight face,
Jerry
--
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Jerry Avins wrote:

Oh, that... http://www.krispin.com/magnes.html
People used to have more magnesium in their diet, and magnesium helps one eliminate heavy metals. Unfortunately, alcohol tends to deplete body magnesium. Good wine should be at least 5% Epsom salt. So should bacon.
Choreboy
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wrote:

uncooked.
So, for the sake of curiosity, what would the proper english user call bacon that was cooked before packaging?

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-- wrote:

The packing houses call it "pre-cooked". I would call it "cooked". I would think it unusual to find a can of pre-baked beans.
Jerry
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I think its Baco-Os

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Bob Ward wrote:

"Pre - cooked" in this sense refers to the "cooking" not the bacon. One could refer to an aluminium or steel "tin" of beans as "pre cooked" but in the U.S. it is as likely to be called a "can" of beans as anything else. Of course this does not even touch on the idea of a glass jar full of food that is said to be "canned".
--
Joseph Littleshoes


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Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
...

Sometimes they can the people who pack the stuff.
Jerry
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True the food inside cannot be "glassed" can it?
Joel

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"Joel M. Eichen" wrote:

I think they use 'jar' as a(n) (ad)verb, as in 'jarred pasta sauce' (normally used as a pejorative). Isn't it cute how people who used to call it spaghetti now call it pasta?
--
Cheers, Bev
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pre cooked = raw pre-cooked = already cooked
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In the case of Joel, he's a "dentist" and probably can't stay out of the meds cabinet.
In the case of Bob, he gets his bacon at WalMart, so you can never tell what he's thinking
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On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 12:07:54 -0800, Robert Morien

...and in the case of Robert ..... well ...... I guess I already said it all.
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Has anybody tried this precooked bacon? I've seen it in the stores, but never bought it because the bonus to cooking bacon is that it also produces bacon grease, which is the best thing for frying eggs in. I also use bacon grease for sauteeing onions for soups ano other dishes.
To cut down on the aroma, which I love, you may want to invest in one of those microwavable bacon dishes and nuke it instead. They sell those dishes at Walmart; they are pretty cheap. I prefer my bacon nuked, because it doesn't curl up like bacon fried on the stove, and the grease is collected in the bottom of the tray and there is less mess if you put a paper towel over the dish before putting it in the microwave.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've used precooked bacon. It's ok but not really very good. It's paper thin, not crispy, barely bacon flavor. If I'm gonna clog up my arteries, better make it count! I nuke regular bacon too.
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Amber Gibson wrote:

Definitely, but there's ALWAYS more than you need unless you have a fat-craving pet.

You didn't nuke it long enough. I have a 1KW oven and gave it 10 seconds per strip, which crisps it up nicely. I thought it was really good.
--
Cheers, Bev
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