Fill washer then add laundry????

I wondered why the instructions on every washer I've seen is to fill the washer with water, THEN add the dirty laundry. So, I called Whirlpool. They told me that the only way to get the correct amount of water in the machine is to fill it first. If you put the clothes in first, then they take up space that should be taken up by water. I then asked them if after the wash cycle finishes and the dirty water drains, and it goes through a spin cycle, should I then remove all the clothes, allow the machine to fill with the correct amount of rinse water, and then add the clothes for rinsing. They told me that no one had ever asked this question before. They had no answer.
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On Mon 03 Jan 2005 10:00:55a, TOM KAN PA tittered and giggled, and giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

Probably because once the clothes have been wet in the wash cycle and spun to eliminate the water, they are (1) still somewhat wet, and (2) considerably compressed compared to their dry state, thus allowing more water into the tub.
Just my WAG
Wayne
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washer
It's the other way around with mine. Put the washing in, then the water goes in after, the amount of water depends on the type of load and absorbency of articles being washed. Rinsing is done until the water runs clear so I choose what type of rinse, how many rinses depending on how dirty or soapy the water is.
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On Mon 03 Jan 2005 01:15:22p, Sweep tittered and giggled, and giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

Curious... How does the washer determine when the water runs clear? Also, how does it determine the number of rinses?
Or, are you saying that you determine that and run various cycles accordingly?
Wayne
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Also,
yeah, sort of. It does a standard 2 or 3 rinse depending on wash program and then there's an 'extra rinses' button. If I'm still not satisfied then I do the 'rinse only' cycle on top.
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On Mon 03 Jan 2005 07:25:01p, Sweep tittered and giggled, and giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

Oh, okay. Basically like my machine. I also do extra rinses 'til clear.
Cheers, Wayne
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On 03 Jan 2005 17:00:55 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comic (TOM KAN PA) wrote:

It makes no sense to wait for the washer to fill. If so, you would have to deal with the water displacement, plus you lose soaking time. I fill my washer 1 or 2", add soap, stir to dissolve the soap, then add clothes as the washer continues to fill. Putting soap directly onto clothing may damage some fabrics. I would think adding soap after the washer begins to agitate is another good option. Also, adding bleach to laundry should only be done when the clothes are thoroughly wet and in motion.
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Phisherman wrote:

I'd like to know what modern washer has instructions to fill the tub before adding clothes. My sister bought a Whirlpool toploader under the Kenmore label about ten years ago. The book said to add the clothes before the water.
The book said this was the way to measure a load of clothes. The book explained that it's best to wash as big a load as possible while leaving the items room to move freely in the water. It said if you put in as many clothes as the basket would hold dry without pushing any down, that was a full load.
It's not as easy to measure a full load if you add the water first. Besides, the laundry will change the water level by an amount that will depend on the kind of fabrics. Meanwhile, you have to wait for the tub to fill.
That washer had a dispenser in which hot water would dissolve soap powder at the proper time.
Sincerely, Choreboy
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Considering that the water level in a washing machine is controlled by a water level switch and associated level setting control if installed.
Whether you put the clothes in first or last would not affect the water level to any appreciable amount. Putting the clothes in first would mean the water shuts off at the predetermined water level. Putting them in last, would not normally exceed the high water overflow level. Some of these water level sensors work by pressure in a closed column, which means your water level after filling could vary considerably depending upon the barametric pressure at the time the unit was filling and closed off the sensor column so it could make its measurement.
By the same token, some work totally on a fill time factor. If your line pressure is 30 psi instead of the nominal 60 psi you may end up having to use higher water level settings to get the right amount of water in the drum.
TTUL Gary
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<< If your line pressure is 30 psi instead of the nominal 60 psi you may end up having to use higher water level settings to get the right amount of water in the drum. >> ____Reply Separator_____ Gary, what is the reccomended water line pressure? I'm running around 80 psi. My neighbor says this is a bit high, he'd set the regulator to about 60. I believe when the township changed the meter, they checked and set the regulator.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comic (TOM KAN PA) verbositized:

Most solenoid valves and other fill valves are designed for a 60psi nominal water pressure!
You will find older cities that still have lead pipe service lines often keep their mainline water pressure down around 30psi, so you don't see many regulators in use. Whereas almost all service areas since the 1940's have fairly high water pressure, between 80 and 120 psi in the mains, so the homes serviced by these higher pressure lines normally have regulators to cut the pressure back to 60psi.
In the 25+ years I was in construction, every home I worked in had a pressure regulator installed, set at 60psi, except for one single outdoor faucet, whichever was closest to the driveway, which bypassed the regulator so whatever supply pressure was available, was available at this one single faucet. Very few homes had more than one of the outdoor faucets bypassing the regulator.
Running your regulator over the nominal 60psi setting can cause premature failure of solenoid valves, such as in washing machines, ice makers, water dispensers, etc. and can cause your fill valve in the water closet to fail prematurely also or even prevent it from shutting completely off. Washerless faucets (cartridge faucets) will wear out much quicker also. Some low end single handle faucets won't even shut off at all if the psi is much over the nominal 60psi it was designed for.
TTUL Gary
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"Gary V. Deutschmann, Sr." wrote:

What washing machine fills the tub strictly by timing? There's a vast difference in flow depending on pipe size, pipe material, pressure at the mains, and other household water demands.
Sincerely, Choreboy
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Hi Choreboy
Not necessarily.
Restrictive tubing is used that allows for a plus or minus 20% variance in line pressure.
Water pressure IS like horsepower to a certain extent. The higher the pressure, the greater amount of water that will pass through a restriction.
However, using a LONG tube as the restrictor (instead of plate) brings line resistance into the equasion. Which helps balance the water flow more accurately against fluctuating line pressures.
Take your refrigerator ice maker as an example. It's fill is determined ONLY by a time factor. In older cities where line pressure is only 30psi, the ice maker timer needs to be increased in order for the tray to fill to the proper level, else you get very tiny ice units.
Using pressure sensors in washing machines to determine the fill level is a fairly new advancement in their design. Early washing machines used only the timer and overflows to control the water level.
These pressure sensors are not very accurate either! Depending upon the barometric pressure at the time you are filling your washing machine, the water level can vary considerably. As well as your location above sea level. Take two identical washing machines and send one to Denver and one to Miami and you will have a 2 inch water level difference in the tub at the same barometric pressure reading.
TTUL Gary
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"Gary V. Deutschmann, Sr." wrote:

So if you get scalded in the shower when somebody flushes, you can solve the problem by replacing your 3/4" pipe with 1/2" pipe?

Really? Barometric pressure doesn't vary considerably unless you fill your tub in the eye of a hurricane.

Who are you kidding? The difference will be a mile, not two inches!

Who are you kidding? In Denver barometric pressure is about 630mm. In Miami it's about 760.
Sincerely Choreboy
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Hi Lloyd
I feel Choreboy earned the kudo's!
Not to often does somebody beat me at my own game, hi hi.....
TTUL Gary

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