Disinfecting colored clothes

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I have a cat that is being treated for a swollen wound on his forehead that oozes matter. He has been on strong antibiotics and still has this problem. Some of the infected matter has gotten on towels that are colored. He will be going back to the vet today and will probably have the wound lanced.
Anyway, since these are colored items, what can I wash and disinfect them with in the washer? I have the old Lysol brown solution, but it makes the clothes smell so strong. I used to be able to find the blue colored fresh smelling Lysol on the shelves, but can't find it anymore! Don't want to use clorax on the colored items that are not safe to use the clorax to keep them from bleaching.
Any suggestions?
Michelle
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snipped-for-privacy@texas.net (Michelle Moreland Orlando) wrote:
-> I have a cat that is being treated for a swollen wound on his forehead -> that oozes matter. He has been on strong antibiotics and still has -> this problem. Some of the infected matter has gotten on towels that -> are colored. He will be going back to the vet today and will probably -> have the wound lanced. -> -> Anyway, since these are colored items, what can I wash and disinfect -> them with in the washer? I have the old Lysol brown solution, but it -> makes the clothes smell so strong. I used to be able to find the blue -> colored fresh smelling Lysol on the shelves, but can't find it -> anymore! Don't want to use clorax on the colored items that are not -> safe to use the clorax to keep them from bleaching. -> -> Any suggestions?
I have found that I can bleach most expensive towels and they won't fade much. Of course, there's no way to know without trying. Is there some reason your towels must be a certain color? Just personal choice? Some of my cheaper towels completely changed color when bleached!
I bleach my towels every time I wash them, and the good ones are the same color they were when I bought them. Just a little faded.
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Hi again, Michelle, Stain stick or similar enzymes should take out blood and pus stains. Ordinary washing will remove most of the bacteria, and a hot dryer will kill those that remain.
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jamie ( snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com)

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Hi Michelle,
Why not get a disinfectant like Detol? These should be safe on fabric without bleaching. If not then try a sanitiser like the ones here www.DrClean.co.uk/Retail_DrClean/OdourTreatments.asp and the Sanifresh. Prochem are in the USA so you may be able to get it locally.
Hope this helps.
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DrClean
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Very hot water and detergent should disinfect them. I wouldn't worry about the bleach, although as someone noted, you may be able to use bleach -- just test one. You might also get some Lysol (the original kind) and follow the directions for laundry if it makes you feel better. Still, most bacteria will be killed by hot water and detergent. Furthermore, most bacteria need some moisture to survive, so they won't make it though the dryer. Just the fact that they will be diluted in the wash water and two rinse cycles will be beneficial. You generally have to reach a threshold number of bacteria to get an infection since your body has natural defenses that constantly kill small numbers of pathogens. A bigger concern would be to make sure you wash your hands after touching the cat.
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I wash all my towels and underwear (white AND colored) in bleach water. Over about a years time I have had some minor fading in my colored underwear, but nothing drastic. Perhaps putting 1/4 c. of bleach in the water and washing would ease your mind.
As an FYI, I also put a splash of bleach in my dishwasher.
Boca Jan

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-> I wash all my towels and underwear (white AND colored) in bleach water. Over -> about a years time I have had some minor fading in my colored underwear, but -> nothing drastic. Perhaps putting 1/4 c. of bleach in the water and washing -> would ease your mind. -> -> As an FYI, I also put a splash of bleach in my dishwasher. I think a lot of dishwasher detergents already contain bleach. At least, they smell like they do.
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On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 06:02:59 +0000, Michelle Moreland Orlando wrote:

OxiClean has worked quite well, in conjunction with Zout. You have to use A LOT of OxiClean though. It reacts and devolves into hydrogen peroxide.
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Dear Matthew,
I have been experimenting with similar things for similar purposes.
Dogs are really sensitive, probbly more than people, their sense of smell is acute.
There are two leads I can give you: 1.) T-Tree oil products. That is supposed to be anti-germs. The EASIEST way to get it is to find a Melaleuca distributor, its an MLM company, and probably you have friends in your sphere that want to show you their wares. There are amazing things they got, different strengths and such. Even the pure oil. Look up T-Tree oil in google for its properties. I"m a professional house-cleaner, and I like to use them and other non-hazardous substances exclusively in my work... cuz i do so much and don't want to be exposed to poison on an hourly basis.
2.) "Pink Solution": this is my STABPLE incredient. I use it on everything, and don't wear gloves for cleaning. I met the manufacturer, and he ate a spoonful for me. (I would gag uncontrollbly, not recommended for everyone to try.) However, it works out cheapest because I use it so diluted, or stronger when I want real action.
I would recommend cleaning/soaking the towels/coloured items in Pink Solution overnight in your washingmachine, before running the load, to get the stains and stuff out. YOu'd be surprised what Pink Solution gets outta stuff. It is my substitute for bleach. Gentle on bras and white things, doesn't yellow like Bleach does, and in fact, has removed yellow on a couple of things.
I DO NOT KNOW if its anti-bacterial or not... my forgetful brain fails me. MIGHT be, and I've been meaning to ask the manufacturer, the next time I get a chance.
However, you could then rinse the stuff in a T-Tree oil product made for the purpose of disinfecting, and that should do ya.
Cheers.
Matthew A. R. Sherian wrote:

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Hot water and detergents will disinfect the clothes. I suppose it is more satisfying to pour a lot of expensive products into the washer, but in the end, you are just flushing your money away.
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Vox Humana wrote:

than the chemical nukes that go under brand names... if mixed properly, it goes further than anything else for the buck!
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I guess you have a different idea of "cheaper" than I do. According to this site: http://www.uniquehomeware.com/cleaner.html 32 oz of "Pink Solution" is $32 Canadian. I can get three 100 oz jugs of laundry detergent such as Era for $10 - $12 on sale - buy one, get two. I use about 2 oz of detergent in a load of laundry which means that it costs 8 cents a load. Here are the instructions for your "pink solution" as posted on the above website:
"Laundry: 1-cup heavy mix per load of wash. 2-cups if very soiled. "
Therefore, it would cost between $8 and $16 to wash a load of clothes with "pink solution." Since the OP was interested in disinfecting the clothes, and it is only necessary to wash them in hot water and detergent, that is $8 - $16 worth of expensive cleaner flushed down the drain.
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Vox Humana wrote:

stuff into a watered down solution, and ...... well, i guess you havent' used it, so you just don't know. I buy the biggest lot of it, more economical that way, too.
Also, since my hands are in cleaning solution all day long, and i have to breath the stuff, I do not like it to be toxic! I use it for windows, (do not need a squeegie, cuz it dries streakless), for toilets, laundry and especially great on wood floors... Compare that to windex, Mr. Clean, all the other seriously toxic ingredients that make you gag, or your bare hands burn. I can put my raw hang-nails into pink solution, and suffer zero discomfort or irritation. Try that with ANYTHING ELSE.. or BREATH ANYTHING else, and see you feel if you drink anything else.
If its not good for fishes to drink, then I don't want it in my toilet!
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I can go one better than you pink solution. Just use steam. That's what I use for nearly all my cleaning jobs, other than laundry of course. Water is nearly free and is entirely non-toxic.
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Vox Humana wrote:

just one of those cleaning ladies that for low wages goes home to home. Sound to me like you need expensive equipment to create steam. How do you steam clean a toilet or under the tub? Do you steam clean teddy bears and lingerie as well?
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Eureka Enviro-Steamer - $39 at Tuesday Morning. Takes no chemicals, so it pays for itself sooner or later. http://www.allbrands.com/products/abp06767-0384.html
Small steam cleaner on sale at Meijer $29. Yes, it can be used on toilets and in tight areas and on fabric. Takes no chemicals http://www.sewserg.com/products/abp02644-0086.html
As you can see, each device costs about the same as a quart of that pink stuff.
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Vox Humana wrote:

enough that even if it bombs, it pays for itself eventually. What does it do to the glue on the back of linoleum? Does the heat cause problems with sythetic glues and surfaces?
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I have used the floor cleaner for about 5 years on all types of floors - vinyl, tile, sealed wood, and laminate. It has never caused a problem with the flooring. I used it on glue-together laminate and snap-together laminate without problems. But, just like an iron, you can't turn it on and then go answer the door, leaving it in one place. They recommend that you not leave it in one area for more than 45 seconds as I recall. The floor is cleaned and dries in seconds without having any chemicals or buckets of water to tote around. You do have to sweep the floor to remove debris before using the steam mop, but I always did that before using a bucket and mop anyway.
There are two models of the Enviro Steamer. The original and the deluxe. I would avoid the original model because you have to use their proprietary cloths with the unit. They are contoured to fit the machine and have an elastic band that holds them on. The deluxe model has spring clamps that will hold any cloth. I use pieces of old bath towels. The unit also is more square and gets into corners better. I actually own both. I liked the original so much that when I saw the deluxe model on sale, I both it also.
If you are interested in steam, rather than buy two inexpensive units like I mentioned, you might consider getting one unit that is a little more costly but more powerful. Home Shopping Network (hsn.com) often features a nice canister type steamer at a good price. When they feature products they often have some combination of price reduction, free shipping, and multiple payments. The good thing about HSN is that you have 30 days to use the product. If for any reason you don't like it, you can return it and they will refund your purchase price and the shipping cost. You would be out only the cost to return it to them, so there is very little risk. Having a machine with a larger boiler means that you can fill it once and do a lot of cleaning. Some machines let you add water without letting it cool down.
A side benefit of the steamer is that you can use it to remove wrinkles from draperies and clothing. It isn't a miraculous cure-all device, and you will have to use some specialized cleaner occasionally, but it does address a lot of cleaning needs in an effective and non-toxic way. In the long run, you will probably save some money no matter what brand of cleaner you no longer have to use.
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THANKS... I shall look into this. It totally appeals to the enviro aspect of my agenda. ;) Thanks for the tips, too... they are in my files. If you can think of anything else.. pass it along, too, please.
(side note: the sweeping thing is no biggy, as I always do that, even before vaccuming, to lower impact on the machine.)
Vox Humana wrote:

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Tea tree oil is highly toxic to cats. Cats' livers don't have the capability that humans and dogs have to handle the terpinols in it. They can get sick just from smelling it, and if they walk on a floor you cleaned with a tea tree oil product, it can seriously poison them by both absorbtion through the skin, and licking their feet.
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