Decks and porches

When we bought our new home, we didn't realize what a problem our back deck would become. It has some green stuff on it, and it has dark areas from junk laying on it. I fell in love with the charm of this home, but the people that previously lived here weren't the cleanest. We have everything under control except for the deck. I read that non-chlorine bleach works well, but I thought I would ask around to see what everyone else thinks. I appreciate all of your suggestions. Thanks, Melissa http://babystepscentral.tripod.com ~*~Where Moms Help Moms~*~
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-> When we bought our new home, we didn't realize what a problem our back deck -> would become. It has some green stuff on it, and it has dark areas from -> junk laying on it. I fell in love with the charm of this home, but the -> people that previously lived here weren't the cleanest. We have everything -> under control except for the deck. I read that non-chlorine bleach works -> well, but I thought I would ask around to see what everyone else thinks. I -> appreciate all of your suggestions. -> Thanks, -> Melissa -> http://babystepscentral.tripod.com -> ~*~Where Moms Help Moms~*~
I have found that the most effective way to clean my deck (and I tend to let mine get real dirty) is with a mixture of detergent (I use dishwashing liquid) and chlorine bleach in a bucket of hot water. I get down on my knees with a scrub brush and clean away. Rinse thoroughly.
Of course, if your deck isn't as dirty as mine there are probably easier ways.
I just now wondered what might happen if I use my carpet shampooer!! Maybe I'll try it.
You'll then want to put some sort of weatherproofer (Thompson's Water Sealer, for example) on the deck once it's completely dry.
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
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deck
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Decks can be high maintenance items. In my area, decks require a good cleaning every year and sealing every two or three years. You can clean the deck with a power washer that can be rented at any rental shop. Be careful that you don't etch the wood - use the widest spray that is effective and keep it moving. With the power washer, you may not need any chemicals. I have a similar problem with green algae on my deck, and the PW quickly removes it without any chemicals. The uneven dark areas will most likely also come clean with the PW. As an alternative, or to treat problem areas, you can use some chemicals. The old stand-by is some detergent or TSP mixed with chlorine bleach in a bucket of water - maybe a cup of TSP and two cups of bleach in a bucket of water. You can get a scrub brush that can be screwed onto a push broom handle, and scrub the deck with that solution and then rinse. There are oxygenated cleaners made especially for decks. They do a good job and are easier on the wood but they cost more. The cleaners will be sold along with deck stains and sealers. I would recommend that you go to a reputable paint store (not the paint department at Wal-Mart) and ask for some advice. Different weather conditions require different types of products. What works well in a coastal area may not be a good choice in the desert.
After a thorough cleaning, you should let the deck dry for a few days or a week, depending on the weather. When it dry, you should follow-up with a good sealer or stain that contains a sealer. Make sure that the product has a UV blocker as it is the UV rays that will deteriorate the wood more than water. Don't be tempted to use Thompson's Water Seal (or what ever they call it) as it a waste of money.
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wrote:

Wear old clothes, rubber gloves, boots. Stir 1/2 cup TSP in 1 gallon hot water until dissolved. Add 1 cup household bleach. Work a 3x3' section and scrub the deck with this solution. Rinse. This should remove most algae and mold. You may need to repeat the washing a second time. Allow the deck to dry for a week and apply a semi-transparent stain with a packet of mildew preventer mixed in. I prefer Cabot Decking stain. The stain should last 2-4 years.
Always use a trivet for pots or ornaments to allow the deck to dry out, else it will rot.
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there is a product here in the uk called Green Clean from Bacti Guard
I have used it in my back yard, and I kid you not, THIS STUFF WORKS.
and, it couldn't be easier. Bonus.
Pick a warm day, wake up early liberally spray green clean all over the affected area.
Open a nice cold bear, and sit for the rest of the day (on the grass, not the deck) Keep your pets away from the deck for the rest of the day. Go to bed.
When you wake the next morning ALL the green will have turned to a brown crust. Simply sweep this up with a stiff broom and a little pressure.
Extra bonus. The Green Clean will keep the green away for up to 1 year !!!
This works on decking, fencing, concrete, tar, asphalt, brickwork, clay pots
don't know about the dark patches from stuff sitting on it though.
If you want to buy some, please feel free to contact me (we sell it in our store).
it comes in 1l trigger, 2.5l can, 5l can, 25l drum
Reguards
Justin Ferrell Cleantech
www.cleantech.co.uk

deck
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I moved to Florida several years ago and have noticed that my house now has mold/mildew on the sides. This product sounds like it would work great, however it is not stocked in our hardware stores. Does anyone in the USA know of something I could get at Home Depot, Lowes?
Thanks
Boca Jan

works
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has
You can use a product called Simple Green. It is widely available http://www.simplegreen.com/index2.html However, using some TSP from the paint department and some Clorox will also work to remove mildew. I use that on my siding every couple of years.
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Thanks! I have some simple green under my sink. Will give it a try!
Boca Jan

also
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BT Newsgroups wrote:

Also, keep your pets away from the bear!
Additionally, I've been given warnings by others that I risk washing away the oil pressure treated material (in pressure treated outside wood) if I used strong compounds and pressure washers. Is this true? In the past I have used car wash compounds, with moderate success, figuring that car wash soaps are supposed to be kind to the wax on vehicles. What do you think? Art
drartieatattd0tnet
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Wood has been treated with a water soluble compound called CCA which is Chromated Copper Arsenate for about 40 years. It isn't made ineffective by pressure washing or detergents. There is a lot of controversy however because it is toxic and the product is being eliminated. It does leach from the lumber and shouldn't be used in play equipment or for planter boxes used for vegetables. You shouldn't burn it and you should avoid inhaling saw dust when working with it.
Pressure washing is one of the most common methods used to clean decks in my area - used both by homeowners and professionals. It is very important however, to use a UV protectant on the wood after cleaning it. It won't rot because it has been treated, but it will deteriorate due to year around sun exposure.
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Thanks to everyone for all of your help! I just can't wait to get it finished! It's been raining here forever, and I'm praying for a nice weekend so I can complete it. :) Thanks again, Melissa http://babystepscentral.tripod.com ~*~Where Moms Help Moms~*~

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