clorox anywhere spray

Page 2 of 3  
"Michael A. Ball" wrote:

I'm thinking of salmonella. Typically, only 3% of humans have it, but many birds, reptiles, and mammals carry it happily in their guts. People who handle pets (such as dogs, cats, rodents, snakes, turtles, and birds) need to be to be careful to wash their hands before going into the kitchen. Uncooked meat is unsafe because it can come into contact with manure at the processor. Vegetables can get it from manure fertilizer or inconsiderate birds. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 22:17:34 -0600, Piper

Anecdote is not Data. Everyone everywhere has a "I know a guy who" story that can back up their opinion.
Hey, many of us grew up not wearing seatbelts, and carseats weren't even heard of.... does that fact make carseats and seatbelts unnecessary? Not at all.
If you have hard data showing the what Mrs B is looking for, then you'd have a valid claim.
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nan wrote:

not if I could find more people who died on my terms - I did say one would have "more chance" This one almost fits the bill. What a silly man http://www.channel3000.com/news/1693622/detail.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 22:17:34 -0600, Piper

A doctor that couldn't diagnose salmonella?!? I wouldn't want him to see *me* in an ER!
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I watched a show once that had a scientist state that the dirtiest area of a public toilet is the floor. I say, just don't lick the floor ;-) All this sanitizing is making kids immune systems too weak to fight off the bugs they're encountering everywhere else.
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nan wrote:

As babies mine put everything they could hold into their mouths - as babies and toddlers do. Obviously if something was particularly grubby or had been dropped into something unsavoury then that would have special treatment but most of the toys were outgrown before they had a wash to be then passed on. I have a few toys still here that the grandchildren have played with and I never thought to wash any of them. I wonder how dirty coins are. They are handled by many and end up in all sorts of places yet the women at my local fruit machine hall , if they can't get the coin into the slot , pop coins into their mouths then put them in the machine. By rights they should all be dead!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Same here. I think I sanitized my daughter's pacifier once, when I saw the cat batting it around on the floor. Who knows how often the cat *really* played with it ;-)
The truth is, germs aren't all *bad*, and aggressive eradication of all of them has severe drawbacks.

Well, I know from my stints at cashiering that money is filthy. When I'd wash my hands during a break, the soapy water from my hands was always brown-ish.
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nan wrote:

I suppose that the good bacteria needed by our bodies get destroyed along with the bad so then we become ill as we haven't the same good protection and possibly could end up breeding superbugs that none of us could cope with- we all know the results on the overuse of antibiotics.

Yes, money can be extremely dirty but does "dirt" equate to germs? One's hands can be quite brown and dirty looking after handling peat but a lot of peat is sterile and I was assured by a mushroom grower that I could eat raw mushrooms without washing them as there was nothing in his peat that would harm me. I still like to give them a quick wipe though, just in case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No, it wouldn't always equate to germs. In the case of money, it's not intended to make your hands look dirty after handling, like you would with peat or soil. Since money is handled by so many people, it does transfer germs quite readily. I know I was always getting sick more during the winters I was a cashier.
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nan wrote:

The world has gone raving mad! Soap and hot water folks. That's all you need. Intact skin is an excellent barrier to germs. I just turned 50. My parents used only hot water and soap. It was rare for me to get sick as a child. I was also at home until kindergarten...no away from home daycare.
Like Nan says, don't lick things, don't stick dirty things in your mouth, (you guys have dirty minds!), and if you think you touched something gross, wash your hands when you get home.
bonnie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That raises an interesting point. I was never in daycare either. Just skipped off to Kindy when I was 5. I don't remember, but I don't think I was sick very often. My 6 year old has been sick a lot since she started school, coming in contact with other kids.
My home can't be considered "sanitized" by any stretch of the imagination. I clean up spills, I do use bleach solution on my countertops when I've handled raw meat, especially poultry, and I disinfect my dish sponges.
I'm convinced that all the sanitizing has had a profound effect on the human body's ability to fight off illness, including kids from homes where we don't go crazy trying to sanitize everything.

LOL
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nan wrote:

I do agree that everyone has differing levels of immunity to things. It's true though that germs are exercise for your immune system.
Maybe the day care thing has to do with children's immune systems not being fully developed until 5 or so. I really have no idea but I do think kids that go to daycare early on, are always getting sick. Maybe we ought to treat them like puppies and limit their exposure to the general public until they are physically ready (immunity).
When I was a kid, having rampant ear infections and having ear tubes placed, was unheard of. Why is that so prevalent now?
bonnie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'll be 43 in April, so I'm not too much younger than you. I remember getting really bad "ear aches" as a kid. They'd wake me up at night and I'd be in tears, the pain was so bad. They weren't treated with antibiotics, though. Earaches were considered something that children just got.
I think advances in knowledge and technology have gotten us to the point of treating ear infections as a more serious situation, now. I do know some adults with reduced hearing due to scar tissue on their eardrums, from frequent "ear aches", as children.
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rosebud wrote:

Fruits and vegetables are likely to have salmonella, and it clings too well to wash off. Small exposures like that may help the immune system. If your system is weak, spraying with peroxide and with vinegar will kill most of the salmonella but leave the food palatable.

A dirty egg will have a lot of bacteria on the shell.... half a million? They are likely to include salmonella, which is normal in chicken guts. Washing the egg sounds like good sanitation, but if you aren't careful, infected water will be drawn through to pores and infect the egg.
For the small operation, it's safer to remove the visible dirt with sandpaper. There will be some germs left, but after 24 hours with no dirt on the shell to live on, most of the bacteria will be dead. That's an example where simply removing dirt sanitizes. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No comments: just shaking my head in disbelief.
Practice safe eating - always use condiments.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Ball" wrote:

Hear me now and believe me later.
I once worked on a farm that produced eggs by the thousands. The invention that made it possible was the refrigerator. To process so many eggs we had to wash them. As soon as we washed them, they started to spoil. The USDA says unwashed eggs will keep fine at 60F, but if they have been washed they must be kept at 45F.
If you're going to incubate eggs, they have to last three weeks at 97F. They won't make it if they've been washed.
The USDA's Egg Grading Manual (Agricultural Handbook 75) describes the problems caused by washing eggs. In Minnesota it's illegal for a grocery store to sell washed eggs. The only approved cleaning method is sandpaper. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I looked up front my table at a restaurant last night, and there was a mother, her young son (~7) and a pump bottle of hand sanitizer! As I watched, the little boy dropped some of his food in his lap, onto his chair, and eventually ate it. I was thinking he might ought to rub some of that sanitizing in his mouth. :-)
Practice safe eating - always use condiments.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Isopropyl alcohol [isopropanaol] is not very expensive. Diluting it will make it less effective and harder to air dry. In quantities you're apt to be toting around, rubbing alcohol won't pose much threat "to kids, pets, etc."
You might want to consider a sanitizing, popup towelette. One jihad Mom to another Jihad Mom: "<sigh> Kids...they blow up so quickly!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael A. Ball wrote:

My aunt liked it for cleaning operating rooms because it shined the stainless steel. Evaporation is a problem. Contact should be 30 seconds with a 70-85% mixture, but the alcohol starts to evaporate immediately, which has the effect of diluting. If you spray heavily enough to kill germs, it sounds as of you could have a fire hazard, a wet wiping cloth, and rapid consumption.
Quats and phenols sound appealing, but you know more about them than I do. Alcohol kills a broader spectrum, but none of the three kills mycobacteria or is reliable on nonlipid viruses.

They seem to use quats or phenols.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think your aunt would have done that very long, if the O.R. Supervisor, or the infection control nurse had found out about it.
If an environmental services employee of mine got caught doing that, I'd give her the choice of being retrained or replaced--for jeopardizing the hospital so carelessly.
I do not believe you can find even one source of towelettes that use a phenolic as the disinfectant. Phenol is the crystalline form of carbolic acid. Frankly, it doesn't cause me any trouble, but no manufacturer would invite the public to burn their skin with a phenolic soaked disinfectant.
Some trees are ever green.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.