Car Cleaning

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Can I use dishwash liquid to wash my car? Car waxing is expensive, what alternatives are there? Why do I get water marks when I hose down and it dries but when a car wash rinses and I drive out wet, I don't? Any car cleaning tips? What about the electric polishers, do they work?
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Yes. Preferred brand is Joy (not concentrated re-fill) and about 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of soap per half bucket (2-3 gallons) of water unless you are going to wax the car afterwards, then you can use much more.

For long-term quality of finihs? None. There are alternatives to wax, bot the process is basically the same.

Their soaps use a "sheeting agent" I think. many also recycle and filter their water. Jet Dry for dishwashers probably does the same thing although I've never tried it on a car. The only way I know to avoid the spots is to dry the car by hand with cotton towles - labels removed or the more expensive chamois available out there...
Or just wax it after it is dry.

Buy a book or video tape (library rental) on car detailing. Ignore all the accessory talk and focus on the cleaning talk.

Yes. Orbital work just fine for most people and are about 99% safe as long as you keep moving and keep the pads clean. High-speed "wheel" polishers are needed for deep polishing of finishes or buffing out rough or oxydized paint, but if you don't have experience with them they can remove the paint down to the bare metal in a second.
--



Joe - V#8013 - '86 VN750 - joe @ yunx .com
Northern, NJ
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On Sun, 27 Jun 2004 11:09:29 +0100, "Jock Strap"

From reading a lot in the car newsgroups, most do NOT recommend dishwashing liquid to clean the car unless you plan to wax it soon afterwards. They claim dishwashing liquid strips the wax off the car finish.
I too hate the hard water spots and my best guess (I never did this) is to use a water softener when rinsing the car. I wash (car soap) and dry my cars each time and try to wax as often as possible but I still see spotting over long periods of time. My guess is professional waxing or electric buffing will help to lessen spotting.
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<< I wash (car soap) and dry my cars each time and try to wax as often as possible but I still see spotting over long periods of time. >> ____Reply Separator_____ I'm guessing that spotting over a long period of time is acid rain affecting the clear coat. The Mr. Clean car washing system does do as claimed, dries with no spots. And also, when you wash the towels that you use to dry the car, don't use fabric softener. This will make the towels less absorbent and can also leave a film/haze on the finish.
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They (we) say that because the soap is so strong... If you use very little then there is no danger... Unless you're talking AJAX powder. :)
The key is to NOT use concentrate (from re-fill type containers) and to use 1/2 to 1 teaspoon per 2-3 gallons of water or less if you can.
The only properties of soap that are important when washing a car are the suds and the mild grease cutting action. If you need to remove real greasy grime, you must use stronger or more soap and then wax afterwars as the wax ona vehicle (regardless of whether they say it is silicone or not, etc.) comes off with degreasers.
--



Joe - V#8013 - '86 VN750 - joe @ yunx .com
Northern, NJ
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Thanks for the clarification which seems to make sense. For me, I prefer to use the right kind of soap because I wonder if so little soap (enough suds??) will really clean the car and what the long term effects might be as well (if any) to the paint.
However your answer addresses the OP's question not mine.
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You can, if you use a mild one, and very little of it. As others say it can wear away the wax job. Which is why I don't wash my car that often (only if it's really dirty, or if I plan on waxing it).

Not really. Car wax isn't THAT expensive, and it adds a protective coating to the paint job. Polishes contain abrasives, which could wear down the finish. They also cost as much as wax. I wax my car every few months and leave it at that.

When it stays there any dries any dissolved minerals will spot where they are. With a car wash they may have additives to the water, plus when you drive away, it "blows" off the water.

Wash in the shade. Use a soft cloth, make sure you aren't grinding dirt into the finish. Towel dry and wax immediately if required.
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Question....
Some car waxes are "combo" products..... that is BOTh a wax and maybe a cleaner
Is it best to get two separate products for this vs one? That is..... get a separate "cleaner" product..... and then a separate wax ONLY product?
Seems to me that logic would be that two separate compounds is bets for this
opinions?
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Combo stuff isn't very good (in my experience), as with spray wax at car wash.
Better to stay with two products.
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Dish detergent will strip wax and attack the clear coat/paint. Some of the name brand car washes sold, if strictly measured as directed, can be cheaper than dish detergent in the long run.
Spray on waxes; however they are not as durable as carnauba waxa natural wax from the Wax Palm.
Car washes use softened water for the rinseeven the self service bays [that's what's in the center buildingthat and 55 gallon drums of wax, degreaser, foaming soap, and the spray wax.]
Yes, don't let dirt build up. It gets increasingly more difficult to remove the longer it stands.
If you use a buffer correctly, and keep the pads clean--dust and dirt free [in a plastic bag when completely dry after washing] they can greatly decrease the chore of waxing.
Cheers,
Ned
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What abt the synthetic type waxes such as NuFinish vs the real carnuba wax products?
What would you use and why?
Would you only use real carnuba wax type products?
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

So I guess I'm the only one here to believe in the protective qualities of multiple layers of dust and dew?
--
Cheers,
Bev
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wrote:

Nope.
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its an old ex-caltrans dodge truck, right?
it was ugly when new
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SoCalMike wrote:

So the dents and color variations are a definite improvement? I've had several people ask if I wanted to sell it. What are you driving?
--
Cheers,
Bev
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Nope,I'm in the club,too.We never wash the old,20 plus year old pickup truck. We firmly believe the dirt is what is holding it all together.
Terri
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wrote:

No. It has its place. But after your car becomes a classic and the value starts increasing, then a five dollar can of wax seems to make more sense:)
Cheers,
Ned
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[ ... ]

I'm having good luck with dew and sugar maple sap.
Gary
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Gary Heston snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net

Contrary to popular opinion, _not_ everyone loves Raymond.
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Gary Heston wrote:

Some people here swear by mulberries, especially when the mulberry trees are favored by birds.
--
Cheers,
Bev
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote in message

That product is a polish not a wax. If you have an old car that is not clear coat than polish will remove oxidation and fine scratches [imagine a dark green 1970 Cadillac, the paint no longer shines, but is a matte finish]; you still need to wax it after you polish.
I drive a '60's Jaguar, [old paint] so once every two or three years, I polish the paint, but I wax it two-three times a year. Twice a year is fine. www.meguiars.com is what I like to use.
I like the durability of carnuba wax and the deep shine; it just suits British Racing Green.
Cheers,
Ned
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